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Ancient Mediterranean Near East Greece Rome Phoenicia Carthage Crete Egypt Jews

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Seller: ancientgifts (4,181) 99.3%, Location: Lummi Island, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 381698447153 TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish 0 document.write(''); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); } else { document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' This Vendio Gallery is best viewed with Macromedia Flash Player 6 or higher. '); document.write(' Click here to get the latest Macromedia Flash Player. '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); document.write(' '); } //--> Your browser does not support JavaScript. To view this page, enable JavaScript if it is disabled or upgrade your browser. Click here to see 1,000 archaeology/ancient history books and 2,000 ancient artifacts, antique gemstones, antique jewelry! The Ancient Mediterranean by Michael Grant. DESCRIPTION: Hardback with Dust Jacket: 374 pages. Publisher: History Book Club; (2002). NOTE: We have 75,000 books in our library, almost 10,000 different titles. Odds are we have other copies of this same title in varying conditions, some less expensive, some better condition. We might also have different editions as well (some paperback, some hardcover, oftentimes international editions). If you don’t see what you want, please contact us and ask. We’re happy to send you a summary of the differing conditions and prices we may have for the same title. DETAIL: A very readable, entertaining, and informative book which covers the subject matter of ancient history from the dawn of civilization to the 4th Century A.D. and the division of the Roman Empire. It uniquely treats the ancient world as a unit in time and also, a unit in space - in geological terms. Michael Grant demonstrates how the classical cultures of Greece and Rome drew on their own past. The book has 3 parts: The Mediterranean in early times, The Greeks, and The Romans. First part reviews beginning of the Mediterranean, Egypt, the Straits and the Aegean, the expansion of Israel, Phoenicia and Carthage. Second Part includes the Homeric Age, Greek civilization, Athens and Alexandria. The third part shows the Etruscans and the beginnings of Rome, The Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome. CONDITION: NEW. New hardcover w/dustjacket. History Book Club (2002) 374 pages. Unblemished except VERY slight edge and corner shelfwear to dustjacket and covers. Pages are pristine; clean, crisp, unmarked, unmutilated, tightly bound, unambiguously unread. Condition is entirely consistent with new stock from a bookstore environment wherein new books might show minor signs of shelfwear, consequence of simply being shelved and re-shelved. Satisfaction unconditionally guaranteed. In stock, ready to ship. No disappointments, no excuses. PROMPT SHIPPING! HEAVILY PADDED, DAMAGE-FREE PACKAGING! PLEASE SEE IMAGES BELOW FOR JACKET DESCRIPTION(S) AND FOR PAGES OF PICTURES FROM INSIDE OF BOOK. PLEASE SEE PUBLISHER, PROFESSIONAL, AND READER REVIEWS BELOW. PUBLISHER REVIEWS: REVIEW: Written by eminent classical scholar Michael Grant. “The Ancient Mediterranean” is a wonderfully revealing, unusually comprehensive history of all the peoples who lived around the Mediterranean from about 15,000 B.C. to the time of Constantine (306-337 A.D.). Many volumes, including Professor Grant's own previous works, trace the histories of the great civilizations of Greece and Rome. But this unique work looks at the influences and cultures of the entire region, including Egypt, Israel, Crete, Carthage, Ionia and the Eastern colonies. Syria, and the Etruscans, as well as the Greek and Roman states. Drawing on archaeology, geography, anthropology, and economics. Professor Grant shows how the great Oriental civilizations; Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, originated attitudes and institutions ultimately passed on to the West. He describes the effect on the people and their achievements of the long, irregular coastline, the mountainous terrain surrounding small fertile plains, the typical plant life of olive and grape, and the rapidly changing weather. Further, he investigates how the demographic factors around this deep and stormy sea caused or influenced the great periods of ancient history, such as that of fifth-century Athens and of Rome in the first century A.D. Appealing and fascinating reading, this impeccably researched history brings a fresh perspective to understanding our ancient heritage. REVIEW: In this superb volume, Dr. Michael Grant interweaves the history of the diverse Mediterranean peoples, from prehistoric times to the time of Constantine to create an all-encompassing study of the cultures that formed the foundation of Western society. 32-page photo insert. PROFESSIONAL REVIEWS: REVIEW: Grant is best known for his extensive authoring of books on ancient Greece and Rome. This volume is a cultural history of the entire Mediterranean region. It is broken up into three parts: Early Times, The Greeks, and The Romans. Grant uses a variety of ways to sum-up the civilizations of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, and Persia. He uses archeology, geography, anthropology, and economics to tell the tale of how these civilizations helped shape the later Mediterranean world of the Greeks and Romans. It is amazing that something as simple as the use of the horse can help shape a civilization. I enjoyed the chapters on the expansion of Israel and Carthage. Both societies were a force to be reckoned with. This is more proof of the power and reach of the Roman Empire which eliminated the Carthaginian world and subjugated the Israelites. REVIEW: It is one of the most persistent truisms of history that the shores of the Mediterranean were “the cradle of Western civilization”. Professor Grant’s book is, in effect, a commentary on that axiom. Its purpose is to demonstrate the why of that phenomenon; why it was in the Hellenic lands, and not, say, on the banks of the Euphrates, that the Greek achievement was possible; why it was in Rome, and not in any one of a dozen other, equally well-situated Italian communities that the imperial instinct bloomed so effectively. The answer, of course, lies in the Mediterranean, and Grant pursues it from the eighth millennium before Christ on to the fourth century A.D., through its Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Cretan, Trojan, Semitic, etc., manifestations, with particular emphasis, of course, on the subsequent flowering and decline of first Greek, and then Roman, civilization. Overall an excellent work of analytic and synthetic history, comparable to his earlier “World of Rome”. REVIEW: This book covers the subject matter of ancient history from the dawn of civilization to the 4th Century A.D. and the division of the Roman Empire. It uniquely treats the ancient world as a unit in time and also, a unit in space; in geological terms. Michael Grant demonstrates how the classical cultures of Greece and Rome drew on their own past. READER REVIEWS: REVIEW: I have read several of Michael Grant's books, including “Civilization of the Ancient Mediterranean” (with Kitzinger) and “History of Rome”, but I especially liked “The Ancient Mediterranean” because of its excellent insights. What Grant does here is provide the specific thing which is lacking in most other books dealing with history: a perceptive look at the interactions between different countries and different civilizations. The overwhelming number of books on subjects in history pick out one narrow focus and deal with it in great depth. There is real value in doing that, without question. But it often comes at the cost of keeping things in perspective. If one reads books about the Romans, for example, one would eventually come to the conclusion that the Romans were the center of the universe and very little happened outside their domain. The same is true of books on Egyptians, Chinese, or any other group. One frequently loses sight of the fact that outside that particular land or empire, the world is going on just fine and many remarkable, even momentous things are happening. I referred to Grant's Ancient Mediterranean often while writing my most recent book "Phoenicians: Lebanon's Epic Heritage." His work was only one of many sources, of course, but a valuable one. I tried to heed his underlying philosophy and keep in mind the interactions between the Phoenicians and all the other cultures which existed at that time in the Mediterranean. What I discovered was that by giving some attention to the Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, Persians and other peoples around them, the story of the Phoenicians actually became deeper and richer than it otherwise would have been. Not only that, but the stories of all these peoples began to take on additional meaning by seeing them in a vibrant and significant larger community of lands and societies. Grant was not the first to do this, of course, but he did it very well, and it is appreciated. REVIEW: This book is definitely worth reading if you are interested in learning more about the ancient Mediterranean world. While there are some downsides to the book, they are far outweighed by the good parts of the book. If you are willing to read through the slow parts, though, you will thoroughly enjoy this book. Michael Grant is very knowledgeable about his subject, and this is especially so for the parts about Greece and Rome. It’s obvious that he enjoys this topic, and that shows through in the writing. The reason this book is slow to read at times is because it is so packed with information. If you are looking for an overview of the Mediterranean world, this is the book to read. For only 400 pages there is a huge amount of knowledge. Grant is very good at tying things together. One major theme throughout the book is how different cultures influenced each other. For example, how the Greeks were influenced by Mesopotamian cultures. He also does not ignore the fact that the Mediterranean was influenced by cultures outside of its boundaries, but the book still stays focused on the Mediterranean world. Other themes throughout the book are how interconnected the different countries and cultures of the Mediterranean world are. He also covers the development of technology, such as farming techniques (as well as the invention of agriculture itself), pottery, different metals, etc. The book covers many different cultures from the beginning of agriculture nearly to the end of the Roman Empire. Many civilizations are mentioned including well known ones like the Egyptians and Greeks, and little known ones like the Hurians. REVIEW: Michael Grant has shown over the years to be an authority on ancient times (in the Western World). He has especially dedicated a number of his books to Greece and Rome. In the Ancient Mediterranean, he broadens his field to the various civilizations around this body of water, particularly the ones on the eastern shores. This book is only partly history. It is also anthropology, as Grant examines what made up the culture of these various groups. Since a lot of this is very ancient, there are not many individuals in much of this book; instead this is the story of various groups. Only late in the book, when the focus moves to Greece and then Rome do we see individual historic figures; even then, Grant only glosses over them as he examines the societies. There is a lot of good information here. REVIEW: Grant is best known for his extensive authoring of books on ancient Greece and Rome. This volume is a cultural history of the entire Mediterranean region. It is broken up into three parts: Early Times, The Greeks, and The Romans. The most interesting part (and the reason why I read this book) is part one. Grant uses a variety of ways to sum-up the civilizations of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, and Persia. He uses archeology, geography, anthropology, and economics to tell the tale of how these civilizations helped shape the later Mediterranean world of the Greeks and Romans. It is amazing that something as simple as the use of the horse can help shape a civilization. I enjoyed the chapters on the expansion of Israel and Carthage. Both societies were a force to be reckoned with. This is more proof of the power and reach of the Roman Empire which eliminated the Carthaginian world and subjugated the Israelites. REVIEW: I have read other Michael Grant books and really enjoy reading about history. The book's concept is what interested me. Explaining the history of all the major Mediterranean civilizations and how they interrelate is a great concept. There is a lot of interesting material here. I enjoyed the discussion on physical characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea and surrounding lands. The information on early migrations into the area and the impact they had on the surroundings was fascinating. I learned about several civilizations that I had little knowledge of and how they influenced the later cultures like Greece and Rome. This book isn't for most people, but for those with strong curiosity about early civilizations in the Mediterranean and how they got there you may want to try this book. REVIEW: Excellent overview The value of the book is in the way Grant demonstrates the interaction of various cultures impinging on the Eastern Mediterranean, far more influential on the development of Greece than I had realized. 1) The eastern seaboard, Syria, Phoenicia and Anatolia, can be seen as the western-most depots of the fertile crescent, which brought the ideas of Eastern culture into the Mediterranean along with prized and valuable goods. 2) Egyptian influence penetrated up the same seaboard and came into conflict with the Hittites in Anatolia, much farther north than I had perceived and brought Egyptian styles and ideas into direct contact with the Aegean. 3) The influence of the Ionian cities of Anatolia in delivering aesthetic and religious ideas from the Babylonian, Assyrian and Persian Empires, was more pervasive on mainland Greece than even the Greeks themselves perceived. Grant draws on various disciplines, archaeology, aesthetics, ancient authors, etc., to pull together a fuller image of how the ancient influences worked. The criticism that he leaps from topic to topic and brings in too much detail does not bother me. It changed my way of seeing Greece, my prime interest, from a unique culture centered on both sides of the Aegean, to his insight that the brilliance of Greece is in how it converted and adapted the Eastern and Egyptian influences into a distinctly original culture. I always ship books Media Mail in a padded mailer. This book is shipped FOR FREE via USPS INSURED media mail (“book rate”). All domestic shipments and most international shipments will include free USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site and free insurance coverage). A small percentage of international shipments may require an additional fee for tracking and/or delivery confirmation. If you are concerned about a little wear and tear to the book in transit, I would suggest a boxed shipment - it is an extra $1.00. Whether via padded mailer or box, we will give discounts for multiple purchases. International orders are welcome, but shipping costs are substantially higher. Most international orders cost an additional $12.99 to $33.99 for an insuredshipment in a heavily padded mailer, and typically includes some form of rudimentary tracking and/or delivery confirmation (though for some countries, this is only available at additional cost). There is also a discount program which can cut postage costs by 50% to 75% if you’re buying about half-a-dozen books or more (5 kilos+). Rates and available services vary a bit from country to country. You can email or message me for a shipping cost quote, but I assure you they are as reasonable as USPS rates allow, and if it turns out the rate is too high for your pocketbook, we will cancel the sale at your request. ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per book (for each additional book after the first) so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. All of our shipments are sent via insured mail so as to comply with PayPal requirements. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. That’s why all of our domestic shipments (and most international) shipments include a USPS delivery confirmation tag; or are trackable or traceable, and all shipments (international and domestic) are insured. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). Most of the items I offer come from the collection of a family friend who was active in the field of Archaeology for over forty years. However many of the items also come from purchases I make in Eastern Europe, India, and from the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean/Near East) from various institutions and dealers. Though I have always had an interest in archaeology, my own academic background was in sociology and cultural anthropology. After my retirement however, I found myself drawn to archaeology as well. Aside from my own personal collection, I have made extensive and frequent additions of my own via purchases on Ebay (of course), as well as many purchases from both dealers and institutions throughout the world - but especially in the Near East and in Eastern Europe. I spend over half of my year out of the United States, and have spent much of my life either in India or Eastern Europe. In fact much of what we generate on Yahoo, Amazon and Ebay goes to support The Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, as well as some other worthy institutions in Europe connected with Anthropology and Archaeology. I acquire some small but interesting collections overseas from time-to-time, and have as well some duplicate items within my own collection which I occasionally decide to part with. Though I have a collection of ancient coins numbering in the tens of thousands, my primary interest is in ancient jewelry. My wife also is an active participant in the "business" of antique and ancient jewelry, and is from Russia. I would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Whenever I am overseas I have made arrangements for purchases to be shipped out via domestic mail. If I am in the field, you may have to wait for a week or two for a COA to arrive via international air mail. But you can be sure your purchase will arrive properly packaged and promptly - even if I am absent. And when I am in a remote field location with merely a notebook computer, at times I am not able to access my email for a day or two, so be patient, I will always respond to every email. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE."

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