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Antique 57ct Jade Tiger ANCIENT SACRED DREAM STONE

CAD 132.43 Buy It Now 3d, CAD 17.20 Shipping, 30-Day Returns

Seller: ancientgifts (4,186) 99.3%, Location: Lummi Island, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 122132523886 TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish Your browser does not support JavaScript. To view this page, enable JavaScript if it is disabled or upgrade your browser. Click here to see 1,000 archaeology/ancient history books and 2,000 ancient artifacts, antique gemstones, antique jewelry! Antique Fifty Six and Three-Quarter Carat Hand Carved Jade Tiger Statuette. Vital Statistics: Weight: 56.7 carats. Length: 35mm. Height: 16mm. Thickness: 9mm. DETAIL: Throughout the Orient jade was known as the "dream stone". Ancient populations believed jade would enable the wearer to access the spiritual world, and was perceived as a sacred substance. It was also believed to be an effective fertility aid, and to provide the wearer with self-confidence. The Chinese believe that the secret virtue of jade was absorbed into the body, and would preserve the body after death. Here's a darling little green jade statuette hand-carved into an exceptionally well-detailed little tiger. We picked these up in Bombay recently from a wholesaler who had kept them in a warehouse for decades. Reputed by a credible source to be circa the 1950's, our experts told us it is certainly genuine jadeite. The carving is difficult to date, as artisans have been producing little hand-carved jade statuettes for centuries. However the art form is dying out, and this is a beautiful piece of art possessing a very rich and handsome appearance. Identified as being carved from some of the world's finest jadeite deposits, this particular shade of jadeite is highly sought after, and can be quite costly. No two pieces of jade are identical, so you can be sure that this statuette is unique. HISTORY: The highest quality and rarest form of jade is known as “jadeite”, and is found almost exclusively in B, Tibet and southern China (and in small amounts in Japan and Guatemala). Jade ranges in color from dark green to almost white. Nephrite, the more common and less valuable form of jade is found in many parts of the world from California to Siberia. ). Nephrite is creamier in color and less translucent than Jadeite, and is the more ancient form of jade, and possesses an oily luster. Jade was used in ancient times for weapons, utensils, and ornaments, and has always been especially valued by the Chinese and Japanese as the most precious of all stones. Many beautiful hand carved jadeite vases, bowls, tablets, and statues produced in ancient China now reside in museums world wide. Both cultures traditionally associated jade with the five cardinal virtues; charity, modesty, courage, justice, and wisdom. Jade remains today, particular in Asia, a highly valued gemstone used in the manufacture of jewelry. Records of the use of jade in China in the production of jewelry goes back 5,000 years, and can be found in emperors' tombs dating back to the 4th millennium B.C. Jade was extremely valuable in ancient China, there are records of an entire city being traded for a carved ornamental jade piece. The Chinese have valued this gem more than any other, using it for currency, ceremonial vessels, and marriage bowls. Since at least 2950 B.C., jade has been treasured in China as the royal gemstone, "yu". The word "yu" is used in Chinese to call something precious, as in English we use the term "golden". Jade was believed to preserve the body after death and can be found in emperors' tombs from thousands of years ago. One tomb contained an entire suit made out of jade, to assure the physical immortality of its owner. In the Neolithic the Chinese were carving jade into tools and simple cult objects (amulets). By about 1800 B.C., they began making small carved ornamental plaques with decorative designs of animals. The introduction of iron tools (about 500 B.C.) made more intricate carvings possible, and jade began to be made into a wide variety of utilitarian and luxury objects, such as belt hooks and ornaments, sword and scabbard accoutrements, hollow vessels, and, most importantly, sculpture in the round. The craft of jade carving in China attained maturity toward the close of the Chou dynasty in 255 B.C., with designs of unsurpassed excellence and beauty. The tradition has endured for over 2,000 years to present day. Throughout the Orient jade was believed to help one access the spiritual world, and was perceived as a sacred substance. Jade was known as the "dream stone". It was also believed to provide self-confidence, and to enhance fertility. The Chinese believe that the secret virtue of jade was absorbed into the body. Jade was said to contain the concentrated essence of love, to relieve thirst, bring rain, and to protect against lightning. Jade drove off evil beasts and helped warriors. In addition to its use in the production of jewelry and great works of art, Jade was also used as well for medicinal purposes. It was used to ease pain from the kidneys and groin area, and aided in childbirth. In addition to the association with long-life, jade is also regarded as a "lucky charm", and jade charms are a favorite accessory for gamblers to this day. Medieval Europe was unfamiliar with jade as a gemstone for jewelry use until the sixteenth century when jade objects were imported from China and, later, Central America. The Portuguese imported jade from their colony at Canton, China. The Portuguese called jade "piedre de ilharga", or stone of the loins, because they believed it to be strong medicine for kidney ailments. Jade objects brought back to Spain from the New World were called by the Spanish version of this phrase, "piedra de hijada". This became to the French ejade, and then, finally, "jade". With respect to the name "nephrite" jade, the word nephrite comes from the Greek word for kidney, "nephros". The Aztecs, Mayas, and other Pre-Columbian peoples of Mexico and Central America carved jadeite for use as ornaments, amulets, and badges of rank. Nearly all of these Meso-American jades are of various shades of green, with emerald green the most highly prized color among the Aztecs. The jade carvings range from plaques, figurines, small masks, pendants, to of course, tools and weapons. The widespread use of jade died out in Meso-America after the Spanish conquest in the 16th century. The less valuable form of jade, “nephrite”, was widely used by primitive peoples as tools and weapons in the Neolithic, especially in Europe, Mexico, Asia, New Zealand, and North Africa (including ancient Egypt). Both nephrite as well as the more valuable jadeite were worked into implements by Neolithic peoples in many parts of the world, however nephrite was most often used for tools and weapons. The best-known finds are from the lake dwellings of Switzerland, western France, and China. The source for Neolithic jade remains undiscovered, but it was probably from a deposit in the Alps. Nephrite is very hard and was prized for keeping a sharp edge. One such variety was used by the natives of the South Sea Islands for making hatchets. Found in Egypt dated 1500 B. C., the "Papyrus Ebers" offered one of most complete therapeutic manuscripts containing prescriptions using gemstones and minerals. In the eastern civilizations of China, India, and Tibet, gemstones were not only valued for their medicinal and protective properties, but also for educational and spiritual enhancement. Even Confucius expounded on the virtues of jade. "Like Intelligence, it is smooth and shining. Like Justice, its edges seem sharp but do not cut. Like Humility, it hangs down toward the ground as a pendant. Like Music, it gives a clear ringing sound. Like Truthfulness, it does not hide its faults--and this only adds to its beauty. Like the Earth, its firmness is born of the mountain and the water." Ageless, beautiful jade, one of mankind's most ancient of treasures, truly fulfills the definition of a "timeless treasure". Join the procession of 5,000 years, own a piece for yourself today! Domestic shipping (insured first class mail) is included in the price shown. Domestic shipping also includes USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site). Canadian shipments are an extra $12.99 for Insured Air Mail; International shipments are an extra $12.99 for Air Mail (and generally are NOT tracked; trackable shipments are EXTRA). ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per item so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. If you intend to pay via PayPal, please be aware that PayPal Protection Policies REQUIRE insured, trackable shipments, which is INCLUDED in our price. International tracking is at additional cost. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). We travel to Russia each year seeking antique gemstones and jewelry from one of the globe’s most prolific gemstone producing and cutting centers, the area between Chelyabinsk and Yekaterinburg, Russia. From all corners of Siberia, as well as from India, Ceylon, Ba and Siam, gemstones have for centuries gone to Yekaterinburg where they have been cut and incorporated into the fabulous jewelry for which the Czars and the royal families of Europe were famous for. My wife grew up and received a university education in the Southern Urals of Russia, just a few hours away from the mountains of Siberia, where alexandrite, diamond, emerald, sapphire, chrysoberyl, topaz, demantoid garnet, and many other rare and precious gemstones are produced. Though perhaps difficult to find in the USA, antique gemstones are commonly unmounted from old, broken settings – the gold reused – the gemstones recut and reset. Before these gorgeous antique gemstones are recut, we try to acquire the best of them in their original, antique, hand-finished state – most of them centuries old. We believe that the work created by these long-gone master artisans is worth protecting and preserving rather than destroying this heritage of antique gemstones by recutting the original work out of existence. That by preserving their work, in a sense, we are preserving their lives and the legacy they left for modern times. Far better to appreciate their craft than to destroy it with modern cutting. Not everyone agrees – fully 95% or more of the antique gemstones which come into these marketplaces are recut, and the heritage of the past lost. But if you agree with us that the past is worth protecting, and that past lives and the produce of those lives still matters today, consider buying an antique, hand cut, natural gemstone rather than one of the mass-produced machine cut (often synthetic or “lab produced”) gemstones which dominate the market today. Our interest in the fabulous history of Russian gemstones and the fabulous jewelry of the Czar’s led to further education and contacts in India, Ceylon, and Siam, other ancient centers of gemstone production and finishing. We have a number of “helpers” (family members, friends, and colleagues) in Russia and in India who act as eyes and ears for us year-round, and in reciprocity we donate a portion of our revenues to support educational institutions in Russia and India. Occasionally while in Russia, India, Siam, and Ceylon we will also find such good buys on unique contemporary gemstones and jewelry that we will purchase a few pieces to offer to our customers here in America. These are always offered clearly labeled as contemporary, and not antiques – just to avoid confusion. We can set most any antique gemstone you purchase from us in your choice of styles and metals ranging from rings to pendants to earrings and bracelets; in sterling silver, 14kt solid gold, and 14kt gold fill. When you purchase from us, you can count on quick shipping and careful, secure packaging. We would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE."

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