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Egypt Steatite Scarab XV Dynasty 1650-1550 BC Hyksos Occupation Period

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Seller: sku67403 (475) 100%, Location: Calgary, Alberta, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 332040030690 For sale large and very fine quality Ancient Egyptian Steatite Scarab. XV Dynasty (1650 - 1550 BC) , HYKSOS OCCUPATION period. The Scarab is in very goood condition considering age. Former museum item. Authenticity guarantee. Size: 18 mm x 13 mm x 8 mm. Perfect for your collection. Great detail to Carving. No repairs all original. Shipping by Canada post registered mail insured to Canada - $15.00, USA - $20.00. World will be calculated. #2. The Hyksos (/ˈhɪksɒs/ or /ˈhɪksoʊz/;[3] Egyptian heqa khaseshet, "ruler(s) of the foreign countries"; Greek Ὑκσώς, Ὑξώς) were a people of mixed origins from Western Asia,[4] who settled in the eastern Nile Delta, some time before 1650 BCE. The arrival of the Hyksos led to the end of the Thirteenth Dynasty of Egypt and initiated the Second Intermediate Period.[5] In the context of Ancient Egypt, the term "Asiatic" – which is often used of the Hyksos – may refer to any people native to areas east of Egypt.Immigration by Canaanite populations preceded the Hyksos. Canaanites first appeared in Egypt towards the end of the 12th Dynasty c. 1800 BC, and either around that time or c. 1720 BC, established an independent realm in the eastern Nile Delta.[6] The Canaanite rulers of the Delta, regrouped in the 14th Dynasty, coexisted with the Egyptian 13th Dynasty, based in Itjtawy. The power of the 13th and 14th Dynasties progressively waned, perhaps due to famine and plague,[6][7]In about 1650 BC, both dynasties were invaded by the Hyksos, who formed the 15th Dynasty. The collapse of the 13th Dynasty created a power vacuum in the south, which may have led to the rise of the 16th Dynasty, based in Thebes, and possibly of a local dynasty in Abydos.[6] The Hyksos eventually conquered both, albeit for only a short time in the case of Thebes. From then on, the 17th Dynasty took control of Thebes and reigned for some time in peaceful coexistence with the Hyksos kings, perhaps as their vassals. Eventually, Seqenenre Tao, Kamose and Ahmose waged war against the Hyksos and expelled Khamudi, their last king, from Egypt c. 1550 BC.[6]The Hyksos practiced horse burials, and their chief deity, their native storm-god, the west-Semitic Baal,[8] became associated with the Egyptian storm and desert god, Seth.[4][9] The Hyksos were a people of mixed Asiatic origin with mainly Semitic components.[4][10] Although some scholars have suggested that the Hyksos contained a Hurrian component,[11][12][13] most other scholars have dismissed this possibility.[14][15][16][17][18] The Hurrians spoke an isolated language, but were under Indo-European rule and influence,[11] and Hurrian etymologies have been suggested for some Hyksos names while Indo-European etymologies have been suggested for a very few names.[12][13] If a Hurrian component did indeed exist among the Hyksos, an Indo-European component becomes difficult to explain, as Indo-European peoples only exercised a significant influence upon Hurrians in Syria after the Hyksos were well-established in Egypt.[17][18][19]The Hyksos brought several technical innovations to Egypt, as well as cultural infusions such as new musical instruments and foreign loan-words.[20] The changes introduced include new techniques of bronze working and pottery, new breeds of animals, and new crops.[20] In warfare, they introduced the horse and chariot,[21] the composite bow, improved battle-axes, and advanced fortification techniques.[20] Because of these cultural advances, Hyksos rule became decisive for Egypt’s later empire in the Middle East.[20][need quotation to verify] Material: Stone, Provenance: Former Russian Museum

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