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Handcrafted Australian Opal Renaissance Source Energy from Planet Venus 9kt YG

CAD 265.99 Buy It Now 17d, CAD 21.27 Shipping, 30-Day Returns

Seller: ancientgifts (4,181) 99.3%, Location: Lummi Island, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 122146230751 TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish Your browser does not support JavaScript. To view this page, enable JavaScript if it is disabled or upgrade your browser. Click here to see 1,000 archaeology/ancient history books and 2,000 ancient artifacts, antique gemstones, antique jewelry! Genuine 9 Karat Solid Gold High-Quality 22mm*12mm Pendant With High Quality 8mm*6mm Oval Australian Opal and a 1.5mm Round Tsavorite Accent. Not cheap gold electroplate! This is a high quality solid 9kt gold pendant. The pendant is set with a gorgeous Australian opal (see the pictures!). The hand cut and hand polished opal is accented with a nice quality 1.5mm round hand cut and hand faceted, rare tsavorite garnet semi-precious gemstone. Includes 24 inch gold electroplate chain (shown). Other chains including solid 14kt gold, 14kt gold fill, and in lengths from 16 to 30 inches are also available. DETAIL: Renaissance-era mystics believed that opal could conduct the energies of the planet Venus through the gemstone, focusing those energies to the wearer. In the ancient past, opals were also ground up and used as magic potions to heal the body and ward off bad dreams. Opal was also used by shamans to aid in recalling past lives, and as opal represented justice and harmony in the ancient world, it was regarded an effective talisman in dangerous places. The original ancient source of opal gemstones, known in Roman times, was in what is now East Slovakia. In ancient times opal was included among the noble gems and was ranked second only to emerald by the Romans, who sometimes referred to opal as the "cupid stone", they also considered to be a token of hope and purity. Here's a gorgeous solid 9kt gold pendant measuring 22 millimeters in length, 12 millimeters in breadth, and 5 millimeters in depth. The highlight of the pendant, of course, is the magnificent white opal gemstone. This is a hand cut and hand polished white Australian opal measures about 8 millimeters in length and 6 millimeters in breadth. It is, as you can see, a very nice quality gemstone. The opal is accented with 1.5 millimeter hand cut and hand faceted tsavorite garnet. This is a very nice quality pendant constructed of solid 9kt gold. Not gold-plated or gold-filled with chi-chi but merely glass “crystals” or “laboratory grown” (synthetic) gemstones. Why would you spend just as much or more to buy costume jewelry at the mall when you can have the real thing here? A genuine solid gold pendant with genuine precious semi-precious opal and tsavorite gemstones! Recognizing that many customers already have a favorite solid gold chain, we do not burden the sale with an obligatory solid gold chain. The gold electroplate chain depicted is included for presentation or decorative purposes. We do have available a wide selection of other chains if preferred, in both solid 14kt gold as well as 14kt gold fill, in lengths ranging 16 to 30 inches. Under magnification the gemstone shows the unmistakable characteristics of having been hand crafted. The coarseness of the handcrafted finish is considered appealing to most gemstone collectors, and is not considered a detriment, or to detract from the value of a gemstone. These characteristics are not only expected of hand-finished gemstones, most serious collectors consider such gemstones more desirable, possessed of greater character and uniqueness when compared to today's cookie-cutter mass-produced machine-tumbled and surfaced gemstones. Unlike today’s computer controlled machine produced gemstones that approach flawlessness in a perfect finish, the cut and finish of a handcrafted gemstone such as this is the cultural legacy passed onwards by artisans who lived centuries ago. OPAL HISTORY: The original ancient source of opal gemstones, known in Roman times, was in what is now East Slovakia perhaps as long ago as the sixth millennia B.C. Archaeological evidence indicates that opals were also mined in Ethiopia starting around 400 B.C. Opal was considered a “noble” gemstone in the ancient world and was ranked second only to emerald by the Romans, who sometimes referred to opal as the "cupid stone". The Romans also referred to opal as “the queen of gems” because it embodied the colors of all the other gems. According to other Roman sources, the opal was considered the ultimate in gemstones, due to its mysterious and iridescent qualities. Opals were used in the Roman world for jewelry and were also carved as cameos. The Roman scholar and historian Pliny (23-79 A.D.) in his 37-volume work, "Historia Naturalis", described opal as having "the fire of the garnet, the brilliant purple of the amethyst, and the sea-green of the emerald all shining together in incredible union". Pliny related in his accounts that Mark Antony (Julius Caesar’s “lieutenant”, eventually Cleopatra’s husband) loved opal, and so much coveted an opal owned by Roman Senator Nonius that Mark Antony banished the Senator, exiling him from Rome, after he refused to sell the almond sized stone. Legend states that one Roman Emperor offered to trade one-third of his vast kingdom for a single opal. Worn as a talisman, the Romans believed that opal had to power to cure disease, and also considered opal to be a token of hope and purity. Elsewhere in the ancient world, the early Arabs believed opals fell from the heavens in flashes of lightning that gave them their fiery play-of-color, and that wearing opal as a talisman would protect one from lightening strikes. In the classical Mediterranean World, it was thought that opals were actually bits of rainbows which had fallen from the skies. Ancient Greeks, amongst many other ancient cultures, thought opals gave their owner the gift of prophecy and foresight, and prevented diseases. The Mayas and Aztecs called opal the “bird of paradise stone”. According Australian Aborigine legends, the creator came down to Earth on a rainbow, and at the very spot, where his foot touched the ground, the stones became alive and started sparkling in all the colors of the rainbow. That was the birth of the opals, also known as the “fire of the desert”. Opals maintained tremendous popularity throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. For a while in the 18th and 19th centuries, opals were considered to be amongst the world's most desirable gemstones, and literally a king's ransom was on occasion paid for a particularly handsome specimen. Opal was also regarded as the patron gemstone of thieves, because it was believed that wrapped in bay leaf, it would confer invisibility. Black opal was considered to be a particularly effective in attracting good luck, and fire opal was believed to attract wealth. Opal was also believed to be an effective talisman for those seeking true love. Women with blond hair wore opal earrings and hair ornaments, believing it would keep their hair from going gray. Opals were also ground up and used as magic potions to heal the body and ward off bad dreams. Renaissance-era mystics believed that opal could conduct the energies of the planet Venus through the gemstone, focusing those energies to the wearer. The original ancient Greco-Roman source of “Hungarian opals” had been producing opal for perhaps 8,000 years before falling out of favor with the discovery of gemstones of much higher quality in Australia. From that time forward, Australian opals came to dominate the market. Somewhere between 90% and 95% of the world’s gem-quality opal now originates in Australia. The name "opal" is derived from the Latin "opallus", and from Sanskrit "upala", both of which translate to "precious stone"; as well as perhaps from the ancient Greek opallios, meaning “to see a change of color”. Opals are generally divided into two groups, white and black. Both share the similar appearance where a spectrum of colors can be seen in the depths of the stone. Black opal, with a body color from a dark gray to black, containing within the full play of iridescent colors, is the most valuable variety of all. Opals are most abundant in volcanic rocks, especially in areas of hot-spring activity. Opal forms in sedimentary rocks when silica-rich water slowly seeps into the host rock, filling seams and cracks. If the water then hits a non porous layer of rock that stops its progress, and the silica-laden water then sits for thousands of years deep within the earth, the silica will settle and eventually form a solid gel, trapping the remaining water within its structure. It becomes opal. In Australia, this happened about 60 million years ago in the Cretaceous Period, when dinosaurs roamed the earth and much of Australia was covered by a vast inland sea. One of the chief characteristics of the opal is the brilliant play of colors that may be seen in superior stones. These colors result from the formation of minute fissures in the stone as it hardens and the deposition of additional opal in the fissures. The refractive qualities of the original stone and the additional deposits usually differ from one another, and result in light interference causing a play of colors. The milky color of many white opals is attributable to an abundance of tiny gas-filled cavities in them. Black opal, with a very dark gray or blue to black body color, is particularly rare and highly prized. The real appeal of opals, of course, is the rich iridescence and remarkable play of changing colors (as the gemstone is viewed from different angles), usually in red, green, and blue. Modern electron microscope studies have shown that opal is composed of numerous minute silica spheres from 0.0001 mm to 0.0005 mm in diameter, arranged in orderly rows and layers. The play of colors in precious opal arises from the three-dimensional diffraction of light from these submicroscopic layers of regularly oriented silica spheres. Throughout the history of the ancient world, gemstones were believed capable of curing illness and providing protection. Found in Egypt dated 1500 B. C., the "Papyrus Ebers" offered one of most complete therapeutic manuscripts containing prescriptions using gemstones and minerals. Gemstones were not only valued for their medicinal and protective properties, but also for educational and spiritual enhancement. In the ancient world opals were thought to amplify one's personality traits and characteristics. They were believed to strengthen memory and to instill faithfulness and loyalty with respect to love, personal and business relationships. Opals were regarded as a stone of hope, positive actions and achievements. Opals had medicinal uses including possessing strong therapeutic value for diseases of the eye, and when worn as an amulet, it was believed to provide the wearer with immunity from disease as well as increase the powers of the eyes and the mind. Furthermore, many believed that to the extent the colors of red and green were seen, the wearer would also enjoy the therapeutic powers of those stones; the power to stop bleeding from the ruby, or the power to cure diseases from the emerald. Opals were used to treat infections and fevers, and were regarded effective in purifying blood and kidneys, regulating insulin, and easing both childbirth and menstrual symptoms. Opal was worn so as to strengthen the immune system and the body’s resistance to infection. On the metaphysical plane opal was believed to amplify traits, whether good or bad, and to bring characteristics to the surface for transformation. It was believed to enhance confidence and self-esteem, improve memory, and to help the wearer comprehend their full potential. It also was thought to bring create lightness and spontaneity, to stimulate originality and dynamic creativity, and encourage an interest in the arts. Opal was also associated with love and passion, as well as desire and eroticism; a seductive stone that intensified emotional states, released inhibitions, drove away shyness and shame, and encouraged sexual liberation. And as opal represented justice and harmony, it was regarded an effective talisman in dangerous places. Last, opal was used by shamans to aid in recalling past lives. TSAVORITE GARNET HISTORY: Tsavorite is one of the worlds rarest and most sought after precious gemstones. It was first discovered in Tanzania in 1967 in the shadow of Mt. Kilimanjaro, though it was not until 1971 that the first specimens were extracted from nearby Kenya. The name is derived from the adjoining Tsavo National Park famous for its mighty "red" elephants who wallow in and spray themselves with red iron-rich mud during the rainy seasons. The park is also well known for its man-eating lions. The rich green color of tsavorite is derived from trace elements of vanadium and chromium. Tsavorite is exceptionally bright and sparkling, unlike emeralds, because the refractive-index of tsavorite is much higher – close to that of a diamond. Because of the great pressures and very high temperatures under which it formed and the subsequent stress releases, individual, relatively clean pieces of tsavorite are generally small. Specimens over one carat are extremely rare. Tsavorite is known as “the King of Green Gemstones”. In the words of one gemologist-expert connoisseur, “with the color of a cool green forest and a fire resembling that of diamond, the price will soar as the fine natural properties of this magnificent gem become known.” If you would like to learn more about tsavorite, please click here and here. The name Garnet is derived from the Latin for pomegranate, "grantum", because crystals in rock reminded early aficionados of pomegranate seeds. However in ancient times garnet was also known as “carbuncle”. Mankind has used garnet as ornamentation for many thousands of years. Archaeologists recently found a garnet bead necklace worn by a young man in a grave that dates back to 3000 B.C. Garnet was used in earliest pre-dynastic Ancient Egypt. Excavations in Egypt have uncovered garnet jewelry dating back to 3100 B.C., garnet being used to construct necklaces for Pharaohs. In the ancient Roman world, it was not only popular with the Romans themselves (particularly for the carving of intaglios for signet rings), but also with the Germanic (“barbarian”) tribes in Northern Europe bordering the Roman Empire. Garnet was also prominently featured in the magnificent cloisonné inlay jewelry found in sixth and seventh century burials in England at the Anglo-Saxon site of Sutto Hoo, and was also popular with the other peoples of ancient Britannia, including the Celts, Franks, and Normans. According to historical accounts, the King of Saxony is said to have had a garnet of over 465 carats. Classical Mediterranean cultures believed that a garnet could give its wearer guidance in the night, allowing them to see when others could not. Garnet was worn for protection when traveling, as garnet was believed to warn the wearer of approaching danger. The Persians considered garnet a royal stone, as did the Russians in Imperial times. Asian and North American Indian tribes used garnets as bullets, believing the stone would inflict fatal wounds. The Koran holds that the garnet illuminates the Fourth Heaven of Islam. The Greeks said it guarded children from drowning, and it was also thought to be a potent antidote against poisons. According to historical accounts, the Greek Philosopher Plato had his portrait engraved on a garnet by a Roman engraver. And according to Greek myth, garnet is symbolic of a quick return and separated love, since Hades had given a pomegranate to Persephone before she left him to ensure her speedy return. Therefore, Garnet was often given to a beloved one before embarking on a trip, as it was believed to heal the broken bonds of lovers. In medieval times, garnet was thought to cure depression, protect against bad dreams, and relieve diseases of the liver, as well as hemorrhages. It was also believed that a garnet engraved with the figure of a lion was an all around effective charm that would protect and preserve health, cure the wearer of all disease, bring honors, and guard from all the possible perils of traveling. The wearing of a garnet talisman was also believed to protect against the plague (“Black Death”), lightening strikes, and was believed to change color so as to warn the wearer of impending danger. The Crusaders set Garnets into their body armor, believing the protective power of the stones would lead them to safety. From the 16th through 19th centuries, Bohemia, now a part of Czechoslovakia, was a tremendous source of garnet, and at one time, particularly in the Victorian Era, cutting, polishing, and mounting garnets was a very rich industry in that country. Many Bohemian castles and churches had magnificent interiors decorated with garnet. The different varieties of garnet are found in almost all colors except blue. Brown, red, green, yellow, black, and colorless stones are the most common. Darker gemstones are usually opaque, and light ones may be transparent or translucent. The best known members of the Garnet family are the deep red varieties, the Pyrope and Alamandite. The Pyrope derives its name from the Greek word meaning "firelike". It was the Pyrope Garnet that figured in the ancient Talmudic legend, which held that the only light in Noah's Ark was supplied by an enormous red garnet. Through out history, gemstones were believed capable of curing illness and providing protection. Found in Egypt, dated 1500 B.C., the "Papyrus Ebers" offered one of most complete therapeutic manuscripts containing prescriptions using gemstones and minerals. In the eastern civilizations of China, India, and Tibet, gemstones were not only valued for their medicinal and protective properties, but also for educational and spiritual enhancement. Today these traditional cultures regard garnet as a stone of "good health", capable of balancing an individual's energy, stimulate desires, uplift attitude, and increase popularity. Medicinally garnet was long believed to cure heart palpitations, varicose veins, lung diseases, and various diseases of the blood. It was believed to stimulate metabolism, purify and reenergize the blood, heart and lungs, and was used to treat spinal disorders and arthritis. Garnets were also worn to enhance bodily strength, endurance and vigor. It was widely believed to be extremely beneficial to wear a garnet when one had to physically exert oneself. For men, it was believed to keep the reproductive system healthy. For women, it was believed to promote hormonal balance and was said to reduce swelling. On the meta-physical plane, garnets were believed to bring good fortune, love, and success, and to improve self-esteem, thus even today they are often carried by businessmen as a talisman. The stone is said to sharpen one’s perception both of self and of other people. Garnet is believed to balance the sex drive, and is said to aid in sexual potency and fertility, to enhance sexual attraction, and to liberate one’s sensual side and so enhance passion and love. Adherents claim that garnet moves a couple deeper into a passionate and sensual exploration of sexual magic. The stone is said to inspire commitment, monogamous and stable marriage, and promises one’s love, devotion, and fidelity. It is also believed to aid in finding true lovers. Domestic shipping (insured first class mail) is included in the price shown. Domestic shipping also includes USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site). Canadian shipments are an extra $15.99 for Insured Air Mail; International shipments are an extra $19.99 for Air Mail (and generally are NOT tracked; trackable shipments are EXTRA). ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per item so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. If you intend to pay via PayPal, please be aware that PayPal Protection Policies REQUIRE insured, trackable shipments, which is INCLUDED in our price. International tracking is at additional cost. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). We travel to Russia each year seeking antique gemstones and jewelry from one of the globe’s most prolific gemstone producing and cutting centers, the area between Chelyabinsk and Yekaterinburg, Russia. From all corners of Siberia, as well as from India, Ceylon, Burma and Siam, gemstones have for centuries gone to Yekaterinburg where they have been cut and incorporated into the fabulous jewelry for which the Czars and the royal families of Europe were famous for. My wife grew up and received a university education in the Southern Urals of Russia, just a few hours away from the mountains of Siberia, where alexandrite, diamond, emerald, sapphire, chrysoberyl, topaz, demantoid garnet, and many other rare and precious gemstones are produced. Though perhaps difficult to find in the USA, antique gemstones are commonly unmounted from old, broken settings – the gold reused – the gemstones recut and reset. Before these gorgeous antique gemstones are recut, we try to acquire the best of them in their original, antique, hand-finished state – most of them centuries old. We believe that the work created by these long-gone master artisans is worth protecting and preserving rather than destroying this heritage of antique gemstones by recutting the original work out of existence. That by preserving their work, in a sense, we are preserving their lives and the legacy they left for modern times. Far better to appreciate their craft than to destroy it with modern cutting. Not everyone agrees – fully 95% or more of the antique gemstones which come into these marketplaces are recut, and the heritage of the past lost. But if you agree with us that the past is worth protecting, and that past lives and the produce of those lives still matters today, consider buying an antique, hand cut, natural gemstone rather than one of the mass-produced machine cut (often synthetic or “lab produced”) gemstones which dominate the market today. Our interest in the fabulous history of Russian gemstones and the fabulous jewelry of the Czar’s led to further education and contacts in India, Ceylon, and Siam, other ancient centers of gemstone production and finishing. We have a number of “helpers” (family members, friends, and colleagues) in Russia and in India who act as eyes and ears for us year-round, and in reciprocity we donate a portion of our revenues to support educational institutions in Russia and India. Occasionally while in Russia, India, Siam, and Ceylon we will also find such good buys on unique contemporary gemstones and jewelry that we will purchase a few pieces to offer to our customers here in America. These are always offered clearly labeled as contemporary, and not antiques – just to avoid confusion. We can set most any antique gemstone you purchase from us in your choice of styles and metals ranging from rings to pendants to earrings and bracelets; in sterling silver, 14kt solid gold, and 14kt gold fill. When you purchase from us, you can count on quick shipping and careful, secure packaging. We would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE."

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