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NEW Lovemaking Sexuality Roman Erotic Art Race Ethnicity Humor Sex Cameos Fresco

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Seller: ancientgifts (4,186) 99.3%, Location: Lummi Island, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 381746767411 TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish Your browser does not support JavaScript. To view this page, enable JavaScript if it is disabled or upgrade your browser. Click here to see 1,000 archaeology/ancient history books and 2,000 ancient artifacts, antique gemstones, antique jewelry! [RARE, OUT-OF-PRINT] "Looking at Lovemaking: Constructions of Sexuality in Roman Art 100 BC – AD 250" by John R. Clarke. NOTE: We have 75,000 books in our library, almost 10,000 different titles. Odds are we have other copies of this same title in varying conditions, some less expensive, some better condition. We might also have different editions as well (some paperback, some hardcover, oftentimes international editions). If you don’t see what you want, please contact us and ask. We’re happy to send you a summary of the differing conditions and prices we may have for the same title. DESCRIPTION: Hardback with Dust Jacket: 406 pages. Publisher: University of California Press; (1998). 10½ x 7½ x 1½ inches; 3 pounds. This animated and readable book will surprise readers who assume that erotic art is universal in its meaning. Author John R. Clarke asks, “what did sex mean to the Romans?” In offering his provocative and thoughtful answer, “Looking at Lovemaking” examines Roman attitudes toward sex and toward race, ethnicity, physical deformity, and humor as well; and shows how radically the Roman’s conception of these ideas differs from ours today. This richly illustrated volume is the first study of ancient erotic art and sexuality to set these works, many of them newly discovered and previously unpublished, in their ancient context, and the first to define the difference between modern and ancient concepts of sexuality using clear visual evidence. To characterize a work of art as “erotic” summons ideas of illicit images to be kept out of public view. And yet Clarke shows us that Roman depictions of sex, in all its diversity, were very much in demand. Visual representations of sex between men, between women, and between men and women, all in a variety of positions and groupings, were produced in a range of media, from fine cameo-glass and silver vessels to wall-paintings and mosaics, to mass-produced ceramics. These works were sold to a broad range of consumers, from the elite to the very poor during a period spanning from the first century B.C. through the mid-third century A.D. Expensive objects, such as silver cups with erotic decoration, were proudly displayed in fine homes as a sign of luxury. Other depictions could be found in public places, where renderings of outrageous sexual acrobatics were intended to provoke laughter. Despite this vigorous artistic production, most attempts to interpret what Roman erotic art meant to its makers and users have used classical texts with sexual content to “explain” erotic imagery. Clarke argues that these literary texts, written by and for the white male elites, shed little light on the visual representations. For one thing, people of both sexes and all classes, even illiterate people, saw visual, as opposed to textual representations of sexual activity. For another, visual artists delighted in showing the very sexual arts that some elite authors decried. “Looking at Lovemaking” offers a vivid image of a sophisticated, pre-Christian society that placed a high value on sexual pleasure and the art that represented it. Clarke shows how this culture evolved within religious, social, and legal frameworks that are vastly different from our own. Enjoyable and informative to general readers, “Looking at Lovemaking” also provides art historians, classicists, and cultural historians with a new model for using visual imagery to understand the processes of acculturation. It returns the art to its original physical and iconographic contexts, while questioning the images in light of recent feminist and cultural theory and new scholarship on ancient Rome. With “Looking at Lovemaking”, Clarke contributes an original and controversial chapter to the history of human sexuality. CONDITION: NEW. New hardcover w/dustjacket. University of California (1998) 406 pages. Unblemished except for mild edge and corner shelfwear which includes a 3/4 inch (2cm) closed edge tear at the spine head of the dustjacket, which has been neatly repaired. The book is otherwise perfect. Pages are pristine; clean, crisp, unmarked, unmutilated, tightly bound, unambiguously unread. Condition is entirely consistent with new stock from a bookstore environment wherein new books might show minor signs of shelfwear or slight cosmetic blemishes, consequence of simply being shelved and re-shelved. Satisfaction unconditionally guaranteed. In stock, ready to ship. No disappointments, no excuses. PROMPT SHIPPING! HEAVILY PADDED, DAMAGE-FREE PACKAGING! #1780b. PLEASE SEE IMAGES BELOW FOR SAMPLE PAGES FROM INSIDE OF BOOK. PLEASE SEE PUBLISHER, PROFESSIONAL, AND READER REVIEWS BELOW. PUBLISHER REVIEW: REVIEW: What did sex mean to the ancient Romans? In this lavishly illustrated study, John R. Clarke investigates a rich assortment of Roman erotic art to answer this question-and along the way, he reveals a society quite different from our own. Clarke reevaluates our understanding of Roman art and society in a study informed by recent gender and cultural studies, and focusing for the first time on attitudes toward the erotic among both the Roman non-elite and women. This splendid volume is the first study of erotic art and sexuality to set these works, many newly discovered and previously unpublished, in their ancient context and the first to define the differences between modern and ancient concepts of sexuality using clear visual evidence. Roman artists pictured a great range of human sexual activities-far beyond those mentioned in classical literature-including sex between men and women, men and men, women and women, men and boys, threesomes, foursomes, and more. Roman citizens paid artists to decorate expensive objects, such as silver and cameo glass, with scenes of lovemaking. Erotic works were created for and sold to a broad range of consumers, from the elite to the very poor, during a period spanning the first century B.C. through the mid-third century of our era. This erotic art was not hidden away, but was displayed proudly in homes as signs of wealth and luxury. In public spaces, artists often depicted outrageous sexual acrobatics to make people laugh. Looking at Lovemaking depicts a sophisticated, pre-Christian society that placed a high value on sexual pleasure and the art that represented it. Clarke shows how this culture evolved within religious, social, and legal frameworks that were vastly different from our own and contributes an original and controversial chapter to the history of human sexuality. The Author, John R. Clarke, is Professor of History of Art at the University of Texas in Austin. He is also author of “The Houses of Roman Italy: 100 B.C. – 250 A.D.: Ritual, Space, and Decoration”. PROFESSIONAL REVIEWS: REVIEW: “Looking at Lovemaking” explores the voyeuristic/vicarious experience explicit in representations of the sex act, the physical coupling of human bodies energized by libido and carrying their own erotic charge. Setting representations of sexual activity within the contexts of public or private patterns of behavior and the consumption of such sexual imagery, Clarke has contributed substantially to a neglected aspect of Roman social history and especially, to the growing literature on the Romans’ fascination with vivid images that elicit, even intensify personal experience. REVIEW: On the walls of bedrooms and baths and hallways, on bowls and cups and rings, the Romans represented every kind of couple engaged in every imaginable form of sexual activity. Clarke makes us see all of this seemingly familiar lovemaking as strange and wondrous. He teaches us to think about how if was understood and felt by those who lived with this art in their daily lives, and he speculates that it might even reflect what the Romans actually did. This is the first genuinely contextual and theoretically informed study we have of a vast panoply of classical art about sex. It will be an illuminating book for classicists, historians, and anybody else who finds lovemaking interesting. REVIEW: Looking at Lovemaking proves that the ancients were very different from you and I; that they saw sex not primarily as procreation and never as sin but rather as sport, art, and pleasure, an activity full of humor, tenderness and above all variety. John R. Clarke, by looking at Roman artifacts from several centuries destined to be used by different social classes, reveals that the erotic visual record is far more varied, open-minded and playful than are written moral strictures, which were narrowly formulated by the élite and for the élite. This book is at once discreet and bold: discreetly respectful of nuance and context, boldly clear in drawing the widest possible conclusions about the malleability of human behavior. Clarke has, with meticulous scholarship and a fresh approach, vindicated Foucault's revolutionary claims for the social construction of sexuality. REVIEW: Carefully written and lavishly illustrated. Clarke is refreshingly honest and straightforward, presenting his assumptions and aims in clear, jargon-free prose. This book offers a well-constructed and convincing analysis of both familiar and unfamiliar material. It is meticulously researched and intelligently argued, an engaging and stimulating book. It is not only a model of the ways in which a creative and ambitious project may be carried out with precision and care, but also a fine addition both to the study of Roman art and to the exploration of ancient sexual practice. Clarke's exegisis of wall paintings from the so-called Suburban Baths, a Roman unisex locker room, is worth the price of the book alone. REVIEW: Clarke teaches us to think about how this art was understood and felt by those who lived with it in their daily lives and he speculates that it might even reflect what the Romans actually did. This is the first genuinely contextual and theoretically informed study we have of a vast panoply of classical art about sex. It will be an illuminating book for classicists, historians, and anybody else who finds lovemaking interesting. There are few scholars as able to take on this material, as well versed in theories of sexuality, and as comfortable dealing with both heterosexual and homoerotic content as Clarke. The topic is timely and the execution is professional. REVIEW: This is an important book, ambitious in the goals it sets itself and elegantly realized. It succeeds in demonstrating its major thesis, that Roman socio-sexual role allocations, values and attitudes do not correspond to familiar modern ones but demand to be understood in their own radical otherness, and that visual imagery can be an invaluable aid to such an understanding. The controversy which “Looking at Lovemaking” will no doubt provoke cannot fail to have a stimulating effect upon the rapidly developing appreciation of the complexity of Roman visual culture. This book should attract not only classicists, but also scholars of sexuality in any field. Clarke succeeds both in introducing little-known material and in defamiliarizing the familiar examples of erotic art. REVIEW: Clarke has produced a major book which contains much that is new, useful, and stimulating in terms of analysis as well as evidence. He melds contemporary theoretical insights and fresh primary data with a hard look at contexts; not only the original settings of the art works he discusses, but also the intellectual climates which have produced modern analyses. The result is a book which points in significant and unexpected directions. READER REVIEWS: REVIEW: Clearly Argued, Captivating Book on an Unusual Topic. Clarke's book provides very clear analysis of the purpose and nature of ancient Roman erotica. He uses a wide range of sources; literature, instructive manuals, precedent in Greek and Roman art, setting, etc., to back up his arguments, which he presents in a lucid style that is as pleasurable to read as it is easy to follow. I particularly recommend the chapter on erotic art in public locations in Pompeii. REVIEW: This is a very worthy study. Clark argues that textual representations of sex don't allow us the same latitude of insight into Roman practices as visual works might otherwise. It might be argued that these thousand-word-speaking pictures do the talking for him, and if that's the case, then I'm fine with that. I always ship books Media Mail in a padded mailer. This book is shipped FOR FREE via USPS INSURED media mail (“book rate”). All domestic shipments and most international shipments will include free USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site and free insurance coverage). A small percentage of international shipments may require an additional fee for tracking and/or delivery confirmation. If you are concerned about a little wear and tear to the book in transit, I would suggest a boxed shipment - it is an extra $1.00. Whether via padded mailer or box, we will give discounts for multiple purchases. International orders are welcome, but shipping costs are substantially higher. Most international orders cost an additional $12.99 to $33.99 for an insuredshipment in a heavily padded mailer, and typically includes some form of rudimentary tracking and/or delivery confirmation (though for some countries, this is only available at additional cost). There is also a discount program which can cut postage costs by 50% to 75% if you’re buying about half-a-dozen books or more (5 kilos+). Rates and available services vary a bit from country to country. You can email or message me for a shipping cost quote, but I assure you they are as reasonable as USPS rates allow, and if it turns out the rate is too high for your pocketbook, we will cancel the sale at your request. ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per book (for each additional book after the first) so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. All of our shipments are sent via insured mail so as to comply with PayPal requirements. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. That’s why all of our domestic shipments (and most international) shipments include a USPS delivery confirmation tag; or are trackable or traceable, and all shipments (international and domestic) are insured. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). Most of the items I offer come from the collection of a family friend who was active in the field of Archaeology for over forty years. However many of the items also come from purchases I make in Eastern Europe, India, and from the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean/Near East) from various institutions and dealers. Though I have always had an interest in archaeology, my own academic background was in sociology and cultural anthropology. After my retirement however, I found myself drawn to archaeology as well. Aside from my own personal collection, I have made extensive and frequent additions of my own via purchases on Ebay (of course), as well as many purchases from both dealers and institutions throughout the world - but especially in the Near East and in Eastern Europe. I spend over half of my year out of the United States, and have spent much of my life either in India or Eastern Europe. In fact much of what we generate on Yahoo, Amazon and Ebay goes to support The Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, as well as some other worthy institutions in Europe connected with Anthropology and Archaeology. I acquire some small but interesting collections overseas from time-to-time, and have as well some duplicate items within my own collection which I occasionally decide to part with. Though I have a collection of ancient coins numbering in the tens of thousands, my primary interest is in ancient jewelry. My wife also is an active participant in the "business" of antique and ancient jewelry, and is from Russia. I would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Whenever I am overseas I have made arrangements for purchases to be shipped out via domestic mail. If I am in the field, you may have to wait for a week or two for a COA to arrive via international air mail. But you can be sure your purchase will arrive properly packaged and promptly - even if I am absent. And when I am in a remote field location with merely a notebook computer, at times I am not able to access my email for a day or two, so be patient, I will always respond to every email. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE."

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