19thC Antique 2¼ct Topaz Ancient Rome Gem of Apollo Zeus Julius Caesar Augustus

$182.80 Buy It Now 29d 5h, $23.49 Shipping, 30-Day Returns, eBay Money Back Guarantee

Seller: Top-Rated Seller ancientgifts (4,724) 100%, Location: Lummi Island, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 123554498034 19th Antique Century Handcrafted Natural White Zircon Accented Two and One-Quarter Carat Blue Topaz and (Contemporary) Sterling Silver Ring Size 7 1/4. GEMSTONES: One antique, handcrafted 7mm square “emerald cut” Siberian blue topaz semi-precious gemstone. Six antique, handcrafted 1mm round natural white zircon accents. Size 7 1/4 sterling silver ring. Total gemstone weight approximately 2.20 carats. All measurements approximate. NOTES: Resizing is available (nominal extra cost). DETAIL: In ancient Greece topaz was associated with Apollo and Zeus, as topaz was associated with the sun, and both Apollo and Zeus were solar deities. The ancient Greeks believed that topaz rendered the wearer invisible, gave great strength to whomsoever wore the stone, and was also worn as an amulet to ward off enchantment. The ancient Greeks also believed that wearing topaz would dispel sadness and strengthen the wearer’s intellect. Both the Greeks and Romans greatly valued topaz as a gemstone. Ancient Romans credited topaz with preventing sickness of the chest and abdominal pain. Both Julius Caesar and his heir Octavian Augustus held Apollo in special reverence. Augustus credited Apollo with his victory of Marc Antony, and erected a magnificent temple to Apollo at Actium overlooking the site of the famous naval battle, as well as an even grander temple on the Palatine in Rome. Here’s a nice quality sterling silver ring which features a stunning, flashy emerald cut blue topaz (the cut is also known within the trade as an “octagon”. The ring is very nicely constructed of solid sterling silver (not cheap silver electroplate), and is new, never worn. The blue topaz is of very good quality, and without visible blemish. The six 1mm accent stones are natural white zircon. All seven gemstones are of vintage origin, originally cut in nineteenth century Russia. The setting is of contemporary origin. It is a high quality setting manufactured by one of the USA’s leading semi-custom mount producers. It is constructed of solid sterling silver. We do have the ability to have the ring sent out for resizing if requested. Though Russia does have some virtually unique deposits of naturally colored dark blue topaz, most blue topaz this dark in color has been heat-treated, so it would be safe to assume that this gemstone has likely been heated in order to achieve this deep blue color (of course heating gemstones is no more undesirable or uncommon than is heating/baking bread – it’s been done since before recorded history began). As might be expected under magnification the gemstone shows the unmistakable, hallmark characteristics of having been hand crafted. The coarseness of the antique, handcrafted finish is considered desirable to most gemstone aficionados, and is not considered a detriment, or detract from the value of a gemstone. These characteristics are not only expected of hand-finished gemstones, many believe that such antique hand-crafted gemstones possess much greater character and appeal than today's mass-produced, laser-cut gemstones. Unlike today’s computer controlled machine produced gemstones that approach flawlessness in a perfect finish, the cut and finish of an antique, handcrafted gemstone such as this is the legacy of an artisan who lived two centuries ago. Handcrafted though they may be all seven gemstones have great luster and sparkle, and to the eye are completely transparent, but one cannot say with absolute certainty that they are absolutely flawless. True, the blemishes they possess are not visible to the naked eye, and the gemstones can be characterized, to use trade jargon, as "eye clean". To the eye they are indeed flawless; however magnified as they are here in the accompanying photo enlargements you might be able to pick out one or two slight blemishes within the gemstones, barely perceptible even at such high magnification. Of course the same may said about almost any natural gemstone. An absolutely flawless gemstone simply is not the rule in nature. Most absolutely flawless gemstones will upon close examination be revealed to be synthetic. You might also notice under magnification occasional irregularities in the cut and finish. Naturally these characteristics are not only expected of antique hand-finished gemstones. You must keep in mind that two centuries ago the mining techniques even theoretically possible, let alone commonly practiced, did not allow the ultra deep mining operations which are so commonplace today. Two centuries ago mankind was more or less limited to surface deposits or near surface deposits of gemstones. Higher quality gemstones which today are routinely mined from beneath hundreds of meters, even kilometers beneath the earth's surface, were simply inaccessible then. It is precisely for these reasons antique gemstones must be appreciated as antiques first, gemstones second. The relatively superlative quality of contemporary gemstones routinely mined from deep beneath the earth's surface today were simply not accessible two centuries ago, or at least, only rarely so. However for most, the unique nature and character of these antique gemstones more than makes up for the blemishes found within the gemstones, as well as the cutting irregularities common to handcrafted gemstones, all of which are by and large (if at all) are only visible under magnification. HISTORY OF TOPAZ: It is believed that topaz was known during the early Bronze Age, as the mining of topaz is strongly associated with tin mining, a mineral needed to create bronze (an alloy of copper and tin). Archaeologists are certain that the people in the Middle-Eastern Bronze Age would have known about this gemstone. However the first historical descriptions of topaz were from the classical Mediterranean. The origin of topaz in the ancient Mediterranean was a small island in the Red Sea known as “Topazion”, a Greek term meaning “to guess”. In Arabic the same term means “"the subject of the search". This reflects the fact that the island was typically obscured by fog, making it difficult for early navigators to find. Typically yellow, topaz in the ancient world was held as a talisman to protect against evil and was used to treat many different physical ailments including asthma. The Greeks and Romans greatly valued topaz as a gemstone, even believing that the gemstone would improve the wearer’s eyesight. Ancient Romans also credited topaz with preventing sickness of the chest and it was also used to treat abdominal pain. The ancient Greeks believed topaz would give great strength to whomsoever wore the stone, and was also worn as an amulet to ward off enchantment (“spells” or “curses”). The ancient Greeks also believed that wearing topaz would dispel sadness and strengthen the wearer’s intellect. There are also frequent references from ancient Greek sources which claim that wearing topaz rendered the wearer invisible. In Rome and the Early Medieval world, topaz was associated with Apollo and/or Jupiter, as Topaz was associated with the sun, and both Jupiter and Apollo were solar deities. Both Julius Caesar and his heir Octavian Augustus held Apollo in special reverence. Augustus credited Apollo with his victory over Marc Antony, and erected a magnificent temple to Apollo at Actium overlooking the site of the famous naval battle, as well as an even grander temple on the Palatine in Rome. The gemstone was also described by the first century Roman historian and naturalist “Pliny the Elder”. There are also many biblical references to "topaz". Topaz was one of the twelve stones selected by Aaron for his priestly breastplate, representing the twelve tribes of ancient Israel. He placed it there as the second stone in the first row of stones. Topaz is also found as one of the stones in the book of Revelations as one of the stones of the apocalypse (one of the gemstones which form the foundations of the twelve gates to the Holy City of the New Jerusalem). To ancient Christians topaz was regarded as a symbol of uprightness and virtue. In ancient Egypt the golden glow of yellow topaz symbolized "Ra", their sun god. This made topaz a very powerful amulet that protected the faithful against harm. Further to the east, in ancient India, topaz was regarded as a sacred gemstone. Ancient Hindus believe that worn as a pendant above the heart topaz assured long life, beauty and intelligence (and would also alleviate thirst). Centuries later in Medieval Europe small wine-yellow Saxonian Topaz were mined at Schneckenstein in the Erzgebirge Mountains in Saxony, Germany, and several rulers wore these specimens in jewelry. The Germans believed that the yellow topaz prevented bad dreams, calmed passions, ensured faithfulness and, when taken in wine, cured asthma and insomnia. It was also believed that the figure of a falcon engraved upon a topaz talisman would bring the wearer the goodwill and kindness of the gods. During the Middle Ages wearing topaz in a ring was believed to lengthen one’s life and forestall death (or alternatively to prevent sudden death). Worn around the neck, topaz was also thought to cure madness. If also mounted in gold and worn around the neck, it was believed to dispel enchantments and calm nocturnal fears. Worn as a protective talisman topaz was said to instantly lose its color to indicate that poisoned food or drink was present, thus protecting its owner. It was also believed to be an effective talisman against accidents. Topaz was also regarded as a talisman for travelers, protecting them from homesickness and danger. In the Medieval World it was also believed that wearing a topaz talisman conferred to the wearer special powers over animals. Topaz was also used by shamans and seers who believed that topaz and encouraged clairvoyance and psychic skills, and enabled the wearer to perceive the intentions and motives of the people around them. It was also believed to make men handsome and intelligent and sterile women fertile and happy. There were as well medicinal uses for topaz in the Middle Ages. Topaz was believed to be able to actually absorb the heat of a fever. Topaz was also believed to ease the inflammations, discomfort and pain associated with arthritis. However the curative powers of topaz were believed to weaken and strengthen in response to changing phases of the moon. Topaz is found in yellow, orange, green, blue, red, and white (colorless) hues. The highest grade topaz comes from Sri Lanka and India, the Ural Mountains in Russia, Brazil, and in the U.S.; from Maine, Colorado, California, and Utah. The most popular color for topaz gemstones is light blue, and the most costly is a rich orange-yellow, resembling the color of sherry wine, known as “imperial” topaz (sometimes referred to as “precious topaz”). Sherry-colored topaz is called “imperial” topaz in honor of the Russian Tsar who owned the mining fields of topaz in the Urals Mountain range (in Siberia, Russia), and the best quality topaz were reserved for the emperor and his family. Topaz is one of the hardest minerals in nature, and for that reason, highly valued as a gemstone. Throughout the history of the ancient world, gemstones were believed capable of curing illness and providing protection. Found in Egypt dated 1500 B. C., the "Papyrus Ebers" offered one of most complete therapeutic manuscripts containing prescriptions using gemstones and minerals. Gemstones were not only valued for their medicinal and protective properties, but also for educational and spiritual enhancement. In the ancient world topaz was thought to heal both physical and mental disorders, and to prevent death. Topaz was also believed to assure beauty, fidelity and long life. Topaz was also used to treat medical ailments. Topaz powdered and drunk in wine, cured asthma, tuberculosis, insomnia, burns and hemorrhages. The twelfth century German Prophetess/Visionary Mystic/Catholic Saint "Hildegard" had an unusual prescription for improving failing vision which involved soaking a topaz in wine, then rubbing the eyes with the gemstone and drinking the wine. Topaz was also regarded effective against bleeding and heart disease, as well as a cure for rheumatism, gout, and soreness in the joints. Wearing topaz was believed to aid the spinal column and help steady and regulate the action of the heart. It was used to treat bleeding and believed helpful to promote health in the glandular systems of the body. It was also believed to improve eyesight. Topaz was also used in treating infections, deafness, goiter, hemorrhage, circulatory problems, digestive problems, combating anorexia, restoring the sense of taste, stimulating metabolism and more. I was regarded as especially effective in treating hemorrhoids if it were worn on the left arm. Last (but certainly not least), men were believed to become more virile when wearing topaz! On the metaphysical plane, the ancient world regarded topaz as a stone of true love and capable of attracting success in all endeavors. Topaz was believed to promote creativity and individuality, and was thought excellent for promoting concentration. It was also attributed with the power to replace negativity with love and joy, stimulating a brighter outlook on life. Topaz was also known as the “lover of gold,” as it is used to bring wealth and money. It is traditionally known as a stone of love and good fortune, bringing successful attainment of goals. It was said to be especially effective when set in gold and bound to the left arm. When worn as an amulet, topaz drove away sadness, added intelligence and gave courage. On the emotional plane, topaz was believed to be useful for treating depression. It was believed to help people alleviate their fears, and was used to treat psychosomatic illnesses. It was regarded as useful in balancing emotions, helping those who go from one extreme to another. Topaz was also highly recommended for healing a person who was suffering from shock or trauma, and was regarded as a panacea for those whose lives contained abnormal amounts of stress or tension. In particular, blue topaz was believed extremely helpful to those who were angry. Blue topaz was regarded as possessing the power of the moon and elemental water. Blue topaz was believed effective in helping the wearer to release their anger, and to bring one’s emotional pain to the surface. Modern practitioners believe that topaz assists in general tissue regeneration and in the treatment of hemorrhages. It also believed to stimulate poor appetite and aid in the treatment of blood disorders. In India topaz is still used to treat tonsillitis, whooping cough, and mumps. ZIRCON HISTORY: Not to be confused with synthetic “cubic zirconium”, zircon is a natural gemstone known to mankind for thousands of years. The word “zircon” originated in the 18th century from the Persian word "zargon", which means "gold colored", due to the yellow color of the zircon gemstones found there. In ancient history the first references zircon are in Hindu mythology, many thousands of years ago in a poem about the “Kalpa” tree, described as a glowing tree draped with gemstones, with leaves made of zircons. In the ancient world yellow zircon was called "hyacinth", from the flower. In ancient Greek Mythology Hyacinth was a young and beautiful young man and was loved by the God Apollo. One day Apollo and Hyacinth were throwing a discus. Forgetting Hyacinth was merely mortal, Apollo threw the discus with all his strength. When Hyacinth tried to catch the discus it killed him. Drops of Hyacinth’s blood fell to the ground and colored by Apollo’s tears, became hyacinth flowers. Petrified, the flowers became hyacinth (zircon) gemstones. Zircon was frequently referred to as hyacinth in the Bible as well, particularly as one of the twelve gemstones on the breastplate of the High Priest Aaron, representing the twelve tribes of ancient Israel. Zircon was also mentioned in the Bible as the stone given to Moses in Ezekiel, and as one of the "foundation stones" of post-apocalyptic Jerusalem's city walls in Revelations. According to Jewish legend, the angel sent to the Garden of Eden to watch over Adam and Eve was named Zircon. Many ancient medical texts from quite a number of Mediterranean cultures refer to zircon as a sleeping aid, and that it was used to prevent nightmares. It was also believed to lose it sparkle and luster at the approach of danger, thus warning the wearer of peril. In the Middle Ages red zircon was believed to prevent pregnancy, and was worn as a talisman in the ancient world by artists, travelers, and merchants. In Medieval Europe zircon was also worn by travelers as a protective amulet, and was believed to ward off lightning strikes. It was also believed to drive away plagues, evil spirits, and nightmares, and in the Middle Ages, zircon was worn to promote riches, honor and wisdom. Zircon has been mined in Ceylon since classical antiquity (at least 2,000 years), and there are records of its use in sixth century B.C. Italy and Greece. Zircon occurs in a rainbow of colors including blue, yellow, green, brown, orange, red and colorless. Blue zircon and colorless zircon remain the most sought after and costly forms of zircon. Blue zircon was immensely popular in the 1880's and was used extensively in Victorian jewelry. Historically the colorless form of zircon, known as “Matara diamond”, has been the most popular and the most costly. This colorless form of zircon looks more like diamond than any other natural stone due the high refractive index of zircon. These physical properties cause zircon to come very close to diamonds in fire and brilliancy. Colorless zircon is occasionally confused with "cubic zirconia" due to the fact that both have been used a substitutes for diamonds. Cubic zirconia is a man-made synthetic gemstone. Zircon is a natural gemstone. Zircons are currently mined in Norway, Austria, Germany, France, the Ural Mountains of Russia, Ceylon, Cambodia, Burma, Thailand, Viet Nam, Korea, India, Pakistan, Tanzania, Nigeria, Madagascar, Mozambique, New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, and also in the United States and Canada. Testing of zircons from Western Australia indicate they formed (in a water rich environment) 4.4 billion years ago, making them the oldest material ever dated on Earth. An even older example was found in a large meteorite in Chile. The oldest thing scientists have ever examined, that zircon formed at least 4.6 billion years ago in the swirl of dust and rocks that became the planets within our solar system. Throughout the history of the ancient world, gemstones were believed capable of curing illness, possessed of valuable metaphysical properties, and to provide protection. Found in Egypt dated 1500 B. C., the "Papyrus Ebers" offered one of most complete therapeutic manuscripts containing prescriptions using gemstones and minerals. Gemstones were not only valued for their medicinal and protective properties, but also for educational and spiritual enhancement. In the ancient world it was believed that zircon enhanced emotional health, helped to heal grief, remove melancholy, restore appetite, cure insomnia, prevent nightmares, and enhance self-esteem. Its healing properties, though principally associated with emotional and physical balance, also was believed to increase ones hardiness and to facilitate continuity in all endeavors. It was used as a talisman for travelers to protect them from all sickness and evils during the long journey. Modern practitioners still “prescribe” zircon as a talisman to protect air travelers, and is still believed helpful to those suffering from low self-esteem come to better accept themselves, and to cleanse the wearer of old traumas, doubts and sadness without being overwhelmed by the accompanying emotions. Along those lines zircon is said to bestow upon its wearers confidence, optimism, and good spirits. It is also used to improve mental abilities, and is believed to encourage interest in science. Zircon is said to be of help for varicose veins, relieving pain, blisters and issues pertaining to male reproductive organs. It is also believed to stimulate appetite, and so considered useful for those afflicted with eating disorders; as well as aid with gastric and intestinal disorders, including constipation. Domestic shipping (insured first class mail) is included in the price shown. Domestic shipping also includes USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site). Canadian shipments are an extra $17.99 for Insured Air Mail; International shipments are an extra $21.99 for Air Mail (and generally are NOT tracked; trackable shipments are EXTRA). ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per item so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. If you intend to pay via PayPal, please be aware that PayPal Protection Policies REQUIRE insured, trackable shipments, which is INCLUDED in our price. International tracking is at additional cost. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). We travel to Russia each year seeking antique gemstones and jewelry from one of the globe’s most prolific gemstone producing and cutting centers, the area between Chelyabinsk and Yekaterinburg, Russia. From all corners of Siberia, as well as from India, Ceylon, Burma and Siam, gemstones have for centuries gone to Yekaterinburg where they have been cut and incorporated into the fabulous jewelry for which the Czars and the royal families of Europe were famous for. My wife grew up and received a university education in the Southern Urals of Russia, just a few hours away from the mountains of Siberia, where alexandrite, diamond, emerald, sapphire, chrysoberyl, topaz, demantoid garnet, and many other rare and precious gemstones are produced. Though perhaps difficult to find in the USA, antique gemstones are commonly unmounted from old, broken settings – the gold reused – the gemstones recut and reset. Before these gorgeous antique gemstones are recut, we try to acquire the best of them in their original, antique, hand-finished state – most of them centuries old. We believe that the work created by these long-gone master artisans is worth protecting and preserving rather than destroying this heritage of antique gemstones by recutting the original work out of existence. That by preserving their work, in a sense, we are preserving their lives and the legacy they left for modern times. Far better to appreciate their craft than to destroy it with modern cutting. Not everyone agrees – fully 95% or more of the antique gemstones which come into these marketplaces are recut, and the heritage of the past lost. But if you agree with us that the past is worth protecting, and that past lives and the produce of those lives still matters today, consider buying an antique, hand cut, natural gemstone rather than one of the mass-produced machine cut (often synthetic or “lab produced”) gemstones which dominate the market today. Our interest in the fabulous history of Russian gemstones and the fabulous jewelry of the Czar’s led to further education and contacts in India, Ceylon, and Siam, other ancient centers of gemstone production and finishing. We have a number of “helpers” (family members, friends, and colleagues) in Russia and in India who act as eyes and ears for us year-round, and in reciprocity we donate a portion of our revenues to support educational institutions in Russia and India. Occasionally while in Russia, India, Siam, and Ceylon we will also find such good buys on unique contemporary gemstones and jewelry that we will purchase a few pieces to offer to our customers here in America. These are always offered clearly labeled as contemporary, and not antiques – just to avoid confusion. We can set most any antique gemstone you purchase from us in your choice of styles and metals ranging from rings to pendants to earrings and bracelets; in sterling silver, 14kt solid gold, and 14kt gold fill. When you purchase from us, you can count on quick shipping and careful, secure packaging. We would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE." Color: Blue, Material: Gemstone, Gemstone: Topaz, Jewelry: Ring

PicClick Insights PicClick Exclusive
  •  Popularity - 364 views, 0.9 views per day, 398 days on eBay. Super high amount of views. 0 sold, 1 available.
  •  Price -
  •  Seller - 4,724+ items sold. 0% negative feedback. Top-Rated Seller! Ships on time with tracking, 0 problems with past sales.
Similar Items