** ATHENA ** Ancient Legionary Silver Greek Roman Ring ** VERY RARE **

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Seller: moesia_roman_empire (328) 100%, Location: Europe, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 303505937300 ** ATHENA **Ancient Legionary Silver Greek Roman Ring ** VERY RARE ** **EXTREMELY RARE**PERFECT CONDITION** ** ATHENA ENGRAVED ** INNER DIAMETER:20-22mm WEIGHT:10,3g Athena[b] or Athene,[c] often given the epithet Pallas,[d] is an ancient Greek goddess associated with wisdom, handicraft, and warfare[2] who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.[3] Athena was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.[4] She is usually shown in art wearing a helmet and holding a spear. Her major symbols include owls, olive trees, snakes, and the Gorgoneion. From her origin as an Aegean palace goddess, Athena was closely associated with the city. She was known as Polias and Poliouchos (both derived from polis, meaning "city-state"), and her temples were usually located atop the fortified acropolis in the central part of the city. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis is dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments. As the patron of craft and weaving, Athena was known as Ergane. She was also a warrior goddess, and was believed to lead soldiers into battle as Athena Promachos. Her main festival in Athens was the Panathenaia, which was celebrated during the month of Hekatombaion in midsummer and was the most important festival on the Athenian calendar. In Greek mythology, Athena was believed to have been born from the head of her father Zeus. In the founding myth of Athens, Athena bested Poseidon in a competition over patronage of the city by creating the first olive tree. She was known as Athena Parthenos ("Athena the Virgin"), but, in one archaic Attic myth, the god Hephaestus tried and failed to rape her, resulting in Gaia giving birth to Erichthonius, an important Athenian founding hero. Athena was the patron goddess of heroic endeavor; she was believed to have also aided the heroes Perseus, Heracles, Bellerophon, and Jason. Along with Aphrodite and Hera, Athena was one of the three goddesses whose feud resulted in the beginning of the Trojan War. She plays an active role in the Iliad, in which she assists the Achaeans and, in the Odyssey, she is the divine counselor to Odysseus. In the later writings of the Roman poet Ovid, Athena was said to have competed against the mortal Arachne in a weaving competition, afterwards transforming Arachne into the first spider; Ovid also describes how she transformed Medusa into a Gorgon after witnessing her being raped by Poseidon in her temple. Since the Renaissance, Athena has become an international symbol of wisdom, the arts, and classical learning. Western artists and allegorists have often used Athena as a symbol of freedom and democracy. Athena is associated with the city of Athens.[4][6] The name of the city in ancient Greek is ?????? (Athenai), a plural toponym, designating the place where—according to myth—she presided over the Athenai, a sisterhood devoted to her worship.[5] In ancient times, scholars argued whether Athena was named after Athens or Athens after Athena.[4] Now scholars generally agree that the goddess takes her name from the city;[4][6] the ending -ene is common in names of locations, but rare for personal names.[4] Testimonies from different cities in ancient Greece attest that similar city goddesses were worshipped in other cities[5] and, like Athena, took their names from the cities where they were worshipped.[5] For example, in Mycenae there was a goddess called Mykene, whose sisterhood was known as Mykenai,[5] whereas at Thebes an analogous deity was called Thebe, and the city was known under the plural form Thebai (or Thebes, in English, where the 's' is the plural formation).[5] The name Athenai is likely of Pre-Greek origin because it contains the presumably Pre-Greek morpheme *-an-.[7] In his dialogue Cratylus, the ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–347 BC) gives some rather imaginative etymologies of Athena's name, based on the theories of the ancient Athenians and his own etymological speculations: That is a graver matter, and there, my friend, the modern interpreters of Homer may, I think, assist in explaining the view of the ancients. For most of these in their explanations of the poet, assert that he meant by Athena "mind" [????, nous] and "intelligence" [???????, diánoia], and the maker of names appears to have had a singular notion about her; and indeed calls her by a still higher title, "divine intelligence" [???? ??????, theou nóesis], as though he would say: This is she who has the mind of God [? ??????, a theonóa). Perhaps, however, the name Theonoe may mean "she who knows divine things" [?? ???? ??????, ta theia noousa] better than others. Nor shall we be far wrong in supposing that the author of it wished to identify this Goddess with moral intelligence [?? ???? ??????, en éthei nóesin], and therefore gave her the name Etheonoe; which, however, either he or his successors have altered into what they thought a nicer form, and called her Athena. —?Plato, Cratylus 407b Thus, Plato believed that Athena's name was derived from Greek ???????, Atheonóa—which the later Greeks rationalised as from the deity's (????, theós) mind (????, nous). The second-century AD orator Aelius Aristides attempted to derive natural symbols from the etymological roots of Athena's names to be aether, air, earth, and moon. Athena was originally the Aegean goddess of the palace, who presided over household crafts and protected the king.[10][11][12][13] A single Mycenaean Greek inscription ?????????????? a-ta-na po-ti-ni-ja /Athana potnia/ appears at Knossos in the Linear B tablets from the Late Minoan II-era "Room of the Chariot Tablets";[14][15][9] these comprise the earliest Linear B archive anywhere.[15] Although Athana potnia is often translated Mistress Athena,[16] it could also mean "the Potnia of Athana", or the Lady of Athens.[16][9] However, any connection to the city of Athens in the Knossos inscription is uncertain.[17] A sign series a-ta-no-dju-wa-ja appears in the still undeciphered corpus of Linear A tablets, written in the unclassified Minoan language.[18] This could be connected with the Linear B Mycenaean expressions a-ta-na po-ti-ni-ja and di-u-ja or di-wi-ja (Diwia, "of Zeus" or, possibly, related to a homonymous goddess),[15] resulting in a translation "Athena of Zeus" or "divine Athena". Similarly, in the Greek mythology and epic tradition, Athena figures as a daughter of Zeus (???? ???????; cfr. Dyeus).[19] However, the inscription quoted seems to be very similar to "a-ta-nu-ti wa-ya", quoted as SY Za 1 by Jan Best.[19] Best translates the initial a-ta-nu-ti, which is recurrent in line beginnings, as "I have given".[19] A Mycenean fresco depicts two women extending their hands towards a central figure, who is covered by an enormous figure-eight shield;[20][21] this may depict the warrior-goddess with her palladion, or her palladion in an aniconic representation.[20][21] In the "Procession Fresco" at Knossos, which was reconstructed by the Mycenaeans,[22] two rows of figures carrying vessels seem to meet in front of a central figure,[22] which is probably the Minoan precursor to Athena.[22] The early twentieth-century scholar Martin Persson Nilsson argued that the Minoan snake goddess figurines are early representations of Athena.[10][11] Nilsson and others have claimed that, in early times, Athena was either an owl herself or a bird goddess in general.[23] In the third book of the Odyssey, she takes the form of a sea-eagle.[23] Proponents of this view argue that she dropped her prophylactic owl-mask before she lost her wings. "Athena, by the time she appears in art," Jane Ellen Harrison remarks, "has completely shed her animal form, has reduced the shapes she once wore of snake and bird to attributes, but occasionally in black-figure vase-paintings she still appears with wings.

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