Ancient Roman Gold Silver Legionary Senatorial Ring* Victoria Gold*

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Seller: luxeon55 (512) 95.7%, Location: Tervile, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 323543565018 ANCIENT ROMAN gold SILVER LEGIONARY SENATORIAL RING VICTORIA GOLDmassive silver senator ring in built-in golden plate of goddess viktoria, unique ring weight - 24.04 grinside size - 22 mmVICTORIA outside size - 26 x 18 mm Victoria (Latin pronunciation: [wikˈtoː.ri.a]), in ancient Roman religion, was the personified goddess of victory.[2] She is the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Nike, and was associated with Bellona. She was adapted from the Sabine agricultural goddess Vacuna and had a temple on the Palatine Hill. The goddess Vica Pota was also sometimes identified with Victoria. Victoria is often described as a daughter of Pallas and Styx, and as a sister of Zelus, Kratos, and Bia.[3]Unlike the Greek Nike, the goddess Victoria (Latin for "victory") was a major part of Roman society. Multiple temples were erected in her honor. When her statue was removed in 382 CE by Emperor Gratianus there was much anger in Rome.[4][5] She was normally worshiped by triumphant generals returning from war.[2]Also unlike the Greek Nike, who was known for success in athletic games such as chariot races, Victoria was a symbol of victory over death and determined who would be successful during war.[2]Victoria appears widely on Roman coins,[6] jewelry, architecture, and other arts. She is often seen with or in a chariot, as in the late 18th-century sculpture representing Victory in a quadriga on the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany; "Il Vittoriano" in Rome has two. Nike or Victoria was the charioteer for Zeus in his battle to over take Mount Olympus. SPQR is an initialism of a phrase in Latin: Senātus Populusque Rōmānus ("The Roman Senate and People", or more freely as "The Senate and People of Rome"; Classical Latin: [sɛˈnaː.tʊs pɔpʊˈlʊs.kᶣɛ roːˈmaː.nʊs]), referring to the government of the ancient Roman Republic, and used as an official emblem of the modern-day comune (municipality) of Rome. It appears on Roman currency, at the end of documents made public by inscription in stone or metal, and in dedications of monuments and public works, and it was emblazoned on the vexilloids of the Roman legions[citation needed].The phrase commonly appears in Roman political, legal, and historical literature, such as the speeches of Cicero and Ab Urbe Condita Libri ("Books from the Founding of the City") of Livy. Condition: 100% authentic, Material: Gold

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