Art African Statue Baoulé 2124

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller art-masque-afrique ✉️ (830) 100%, Location: furiani, Corse, FR, Ships to: WORLDWIDE, Item: 255595093506 Art African Statue Baoulé 2124. Ref: sf-2124Height: 37cmProduct DescriptionBaoule statue. Old piece over 40 years old. The Baoulé are a people of Côte d'Ivoire living mostly in the center of the country. They are about three million individuals and are part of the Akan group. In the 17th century they were guided by members of the Baoulé royal clan headed by Queen Abla Pokou. The Baoulé name or `'ba or li'' means the child is dead. This sacrifice gave the right to cross the Comoé River while they were pursued by the enemy. Queen Abla Pokou will extend her hegemony over the center of the country and create city-states organized into eight clans, the Oualèbo, Nzikpli, Saafwè, Faafwè, Ahitou, Nanafwè, Agba and N'gban. The Baoulé universe is made up of three realities: first the firmament which is the domain of God (Annangaman Nyamien) then the terrestrial world domain of human, animal, vegetable living beings and geniuses. And finally the beyond (blôlô) domain of supernatural beings where the soul of the ancestors resides. The Baoulé believe in a creator god (Nyamien), intangible and inaccessible. The god of the earth (Assiè) controls men and animals. Spirits or Amuen are endowed with supernatural powers. The real world is the opposite of the spiritual world (blôlô) from which souls come at birth and where they will return when they die. Religion is based on the idea of death and the immortality of the soul. The Baoulé are traditionally animists and despite the introduction of new cults (Catholic, Protestant, Deima and Muslim), the vast majority remain so. The ancestors are the object of a cult but are not represented. This brings us back to individual worship. Generally the spirits of the earth or (Assiè oussou) manifest the need to live with humans and even to marry (blôlô bian or blôlô bla). They are represented by statuettes and have fits of jealousy when their spouse leaves them. The Bonu Amuen (bush spirits) protects the village from external threats, imposes discipline on women and appears at commemorations of the dead of notables. The bush spirits have their own shrines where they receive sacrifices. When they intervene in community life, they take the form of a wooden helmet representing a buffalo or an antelope and are worn with raffia costumes, metal ankle bracelets; the muzzle has teeth that embody the strength of the fierce animal that must defend them. The Djè and Dô dances bear the name of Amuen because of their power. They have a function of protection against envious people and evildoers. These Amuen need to be reactivated by sacrifices to maintain their powers. The Baoulé always dread the villages or the individuals who are fond of the Amuen. The Baoulé are very mobile, which has facilitated the movement of crops. They imported various types of dance on the journeys. Baoulé history is remarkable for the recent character of the constitution of the ethnic group; before 1730, the Baoulé as such did not exist; by the extremely heterogeneous nature of the background made up of Gouro, Senoufo (Tagouana, Djimini, Djamala) and Akan (Alanguira and Assabou) to name only the most important groups; The Baoulé culture bears the imprints of the Gouro, the Malinké and the Wan. This Malinke cultural influence on the Baoulé peoples manifests itself more directly in the north of the Baoulé region (Bandaman valley) in the departments of Béoumi and Diabo. These sub-groups practice the ceremonies of initiation and excision of the young girl. The Djéla and the Goli (sacred dance and at the same time of rejoicing are widespread in the central Bandaman region. They were borrowed respectively from the Gouro and the Wan. The origin of these dances is beyond doubt since they continue to be practiced in Gouro and Wan countries. The very characteristic round, 'lunar' shaped Goli is surmounted by two horns. It was borrowed for a party by the Baoulé after 1900. Celebrating peace and joy, people sang, danced and drank palm wine. In the procession, the Goli preceded the four groups of dancers and represented the young adolescents. The Goli "came out" on the occasion of the new harvest, the visit of dignitaries or the funerals of notables. The masks correspond to three types of dances: the gba gba, the bonu Amuen and the goh. They never represent ancestors and are always worn by men. Of Gouro origin, the gba gba is used at women's funerals and during the harvest season. It celebrates beauty and age, hence the finesse of its features. The double mask represents the marriage of the sun and the moon or the twins whose birth is always a good sign. The Adjanou is a sacred dance forbidden to men who hunts evil spirits and wards off bad luck while protecting the community. Goldsmithing, which is an Akan specialty, was taught to the Gouro of Sinfra (the Goy or baba) by the baoulé. They speak Baoulé as a second language. Craftsmanship occupies a primordial place in social life; by the variety of its production and its destination. Thus we can speak of everyday household objects such as basketry (fan baskets, baskets, etc.), pottery (canary, plates, bowls, etc.), sculpture, mortars and pestles. The weaving of hunting and fishing nets and the carving of canoes, paddles and hoe handles are part of Baoulé art along with sacred objects such as masks and statuettes. The Baoulé masks and statuettes have aroused the enthusiasm of Westerners as soon as they are exhibited. They are considered one of the most accomplished achievements of African art, which is why these sculptures always occupy a prominent place in any exhibition or study devoted to Africa. However, as important as their fame in the West is, it has never been easy for anyone to see the representations of this art on the very places of its creation in the Baoulé villages. Goldsmith ornaments (jewelry and ornaments) namely the weaving of loincloths (baouwlé tanni) are Baoulé know-how. Weights for weighing gold, jewellery, objects decorated in gold of all kinds have existed and exist among the Baoulé. These people have an admiration for gold which is a symbol of heritage, opulence, power, and which must be avoided but deserved. The ''baouwlé Tanni" are very popular for their quality and their patterns. The Baoulé Akouè and Ahitou of the Yamoussoukro and Tiébissou regions are the best producers. If these works of art are also sometimes used for the economy or politics, they mainly satisfy personal needs related to serenity of mind or physical health. They manage to integrate themselves alongside natural persons, and this is an aspect that Baoulé healers use for their practice of psychological support, helping to solve problems through the medium of a privileged personal relationship with a sculpted figure. . The Baoulé have undergone the cultural influence of the Gouro, Senoufo, Wan etc. they were allied to fight the common enemy who represented the white settler. At the beginning of the 20th century, Baoulé society was characterized, according to Maurice Delafosse, by extreme individualism and great tolerance. Each village was independent of the others and decided for itself under the chairmanship of the council of elders. Everyone took part in the palavers, including the slaves. It was an egalitarian society.African art, African maskafrican art african tribal arte africana afrikanische kunstPart delivered with an invoice and a certificate of authenticity.The Baoulé believe in a creator god (Nyamien), intangible and inaccessible. The god of the earth (Assiè) controls men and animals. Spirits or Amuen are endowed with supernatural powers. The real world is the opposite of the spiritual world (blôlô) from which souls come at birth and where they will return when they die. Religion is based on the idea of death and the immortality of the soul. The Baoulé are traditionally animists and despite the introduction of new cults (Catholic, Protestant, Deima and Muslim), the vast majority remain so. The ancestors are the object of a cult but are not represented. This brings us back to individual worship. Generally the spirits of the earth or (Assiè oussou) manifest the need to live with humans and even to marry (blôlô bian or blôlô bla). They are re Origine: Africa, Material: Wood, Type: Figure, Statue, Authenticity: Original, Brand: Unbranded

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