Art African Tompbyrne (Britain's Got Talent) 2086

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller art-masque-afrique ✉️ (830) 100%, Location: furiani, Corse, FR, Ships to: WORLDWIDE, Item: 255501493045 Art African Tompbyrne (Britain's Got Talent) 2086. Ref: sf-2086 Height: 43cmProduct Description :Mamiwata Adan fetish from Ghana. Original piece over 40 years old. African Mythologies. Mamiwata, Mother of the Waters MamiWata comes from "Mother water", quickly transformed into "Mommy Water", then into "Mammy water", and finally into "MamiWata". Mamiwata is the Mother of the waters, half-woman half-fish, half-terrestrial half-aquatic, goddess of worship voodoo in Togo and Benin, water spirit feared by the fishermen of Nigeria and Ghana, eater of men who wanders in the African night in the guise of a ghost, patron saint of prostitutes in Kinshasa. Mamiwata is a deity who is the object of as many cults as there are followers. Heroine of lake tales and urban legends, she covers as many symbols as cultures, and embodies as many virtues as hopes, as many evil spells as fears. This mermaid is one of the few deities in African mythology to be represented, pictorially speaking, in recurring features and form. The Gods of the Yoruba pantheon are almost the only ones to have human effigies and representations. Remember that one of the characteristics of African spirituality is its ability to "animate" objects and beings belonging to the animal, vegetable or mineral world, by recognizing in them a soul and an existence of their own. But also by investing them with powers and symbols, allowing men to communicate with the “invisible” world, that of the dead and the spirits. The myths of origins, creation, cosmogony, which explain the origin, essence and meaning of the world, are symbolized, among most African peoples, by natural elements such as water, earth or fire, by animal-totems embodying the primordial being, by ancestral, heroic or legendary figures. The majority of the elements that make up their spiritual universe are therefore already in nature, they are nature itself. Mamiwata, in addition to being a hybrid being, is an alien deity. Foreign to men and foreign to nature. It is a supernatural creature, because it embodies the crossing of three worlds: animal, human and spiritual. This hybridity, which is in fact a deformity, because it makes Mamiwata a "monster", paradoxically gives him all his powers. Mamiwata is also the only African deity, venerated or known in a geographical space bringing together cultures and peoples as diverse as the Ibo of Nigeria, the Ewe of Benin, the Bamileke of Cameroon and the Kongo of the DRC. Although she is the object of different cults and is attached to very specific symbols according to ethnic groups, beliefs, but also social backgrounds, we can say that Mamiwata is a “pan-African” goddess. Based on the "coastal" location of the countries where the cult of Mamiwata is most widespread, namely the Gulf of Guinea, for Nigeria, Ghana, Benin and Togo, and Central Africa for Cameroon and DRC, some researchers have come to the conclusion that Mamiwata, in its modern representation, first appeared in Africa in the 15th century, when Europeans approached the coasts of the black continent. The mermaid would have been introduced to Africa, both by the stories of European sailors, but also by the figureheads of their ships, which very often represented this fabulous creature. In the middle of the 19th century, another image, entitled "the snake charmer", inspired by Hindu goddesses, was taken to Africa. It circulated extensively in West Africa, where it was perceived as a mystical painting, by its strangeness, by the power and beauty of the female figure, whose features resembled those of an African. Moreover, the theme of the serpent accorded with African beliefs about this sacred animal. It is more likely that these images and stories influenced the figurative representation of Mamiwata, giving it a "human" face and characters, but they did not invent it. Africans have only appropriated these external elements, they have reinvented them in order to better integrate them into existing beliefs. Aquatic or lacustrine deities were already very numerous, in West Africa as in Central Africa. In the Ibo culture of Nigeria, the ndi mmili, water spirits, were venerated, while in the Kongo civilization, these spirits bore the name of mbumba, and often referred to a large mythical serpent. The Mamiwata deity was integrated into the pantheon of pre-existing vodun gods on the basis of one or more water deities, but above all through the Dan cult of the royal python, practiced by the Mina, the Ewe, the Adja , the Fon, the Yoruba and the Ibo. The vodun religion having crossed the Atlantic with African slaves during nearly four centuries of trafficking, the Mamiwata siren is also very present in certain cults of the black diaspora. In particular those of Candomblé in Brazil, where it bears the name of Yemanja, and those of Santeria in Cuba, where the descendants of African slaves baptized it Yemoya. Mamiwata is therefore a subtle combination of African beliefs and both European and Indian imagery. The "foreign" aspect of Mamiwata has always been strongly emphasized in his pictorial representation, as a symbol of the cultural upheavals brought about by the slave trade and European colonization. Mamiwata, as an allegory of colonial power and violence, symbolizes the negative influence of the outside world on African values. The goddess comes from the world of the waters, the seas, the oceans through which the first Portuguese, then Dutch, English and French ships came, which took millions of slaves to the Americas, and imposed their political, economic and cultural. Although his physical depiction and symbolism varies across cultures, in his most common depiction, everything about Mamiwata is reminiscent of the white man of the colonial and contemporary periods. Her physical characteristics are those of a European (white skin and long hair), as are her temperament (authoritarian, selfish, vain with a strong sense of superiority), her morals (free, amoral and individualistic) and her powers. (linked to money, external signs of wealth and economic success). But despite all this syncretism, this mixture of influences and symbolisms, Mamiwata is indeed an African divinity. It is for many an allegory, a projection of sexual desires, economic difficulties, hopes for social advancement. Its hybridity and its “monstrosity” above all reflect the disarray of African societies in the face of their own changes, between tradition and modernity, between authenticity and alienation. In the countries of Central Africa, such as Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of Congo for example, this divinity, or rather his spirit, appears in the heart of large cities, preferably at nightfall. It is also very present in the markets, another allegory of the invisible world, which by their abundance attracts the covetousness of ghosts and evil spirits. Mamiwata appears mostly in bars and places of debauchery, always in the guise of a very beautiful woman who leads men into madness. In Congolese folklore, Mamiwata is a prostitute who tempts and perverts men. It symbolizes all the excesses linked to sexuality: polygamy, infidelity, but above all AIDS. The myth of Mamiwata is far from fixed. It feeds each day on new symbols given to it by those who appropriate it. Like all myths, Mamiwata has the function of embodying a positive or negative worldview. Whether it is a spiritual landmark or a scapegoat, it constitutes a means of expressing the dreams and fears aroused in Africa by the uncertainties of the modern world.Delivered with an invoice and a certificate of authenticity.African art, African masksafrican art african tribal arte africana afrikanische kunstBased on the "coastal" location of the countries where the cult of Mamiwata is most widespread, namely the Gulf of Guinea, for Nigeria, Ghana, Benin and Togo, and Central Africa for Cameroon and DRC, some researchers have come to the conclusion that Mamiwata, in its modern representation, first appeared in Africa in the 15th century, when Europeans approached the coasts of the black continent. The mermaid would have been introduced to Africa, both by the stories of European sailors, but also by the figureheads of their ships, which very often represented this fabulous creature. In the middle of the 19th century, another image, entitled "the snake charmer", inspired by Hindu goddesses, was taken to Africa. It circulated extensively in West Africa, where it was perceived as a mystical painti Origine: Africa, Material: Wood, Type: Figure, Statue, Authenticity: Original, Brand: Unbranded

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