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Orig Excellent 1942-1943 Hood Rubber Co M1 Helmet Liner W/painted T-5 Insignia

$304.15 5 Bids Sold, CAD $50.69 Shipping

Seller: msaco (3,880) 100%, Location: Flagstaff, Arizona, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 263883608734 This is an original U.S. 1942-1943 low-pressure WWII M1 helmet liner, made by the Hood Rubber Company, using their short-lived and ultimately unsuccessful "ball winding" manufacturing process. These helmet liners are scarce, only about 200,000 were ever made. An example with rank-painted insignia is particularly rare, this one is in fine condition and 100% original WWII. ************* The earliest helmet liners for the M1 steel helmet, introduced in the latter part of 1941, were the cloth-covered paper liners made by the Hawley Products Company. The problems inherent in a paper helmet liner were soon apparent, as they were fragile and did not hold up to moisture. In late 1941, the U.S. Army asked a number of industrial firms to begin experimenting with a manufacturing process to produce a more durable, water-resistant M1 helmet liner. Several companies, including the Inland Manufacturing Division of General Motors, the Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) company, and the Westinghouse corporation began development of a high-pressure, resin-impregnated cloth helmet liner. Two companies, the St. Clair Company of Marysville, Michigan, and the Hood Rubber Company, Inc., of Watertown, Massachusetts, took another approach, one involving a low-pressure method of creating a resin-impregnated cloth liner. The Hood Rubber company adopted a unique process, known as the ball-winding low-pressure method. In April, 1942, Hood was given a contract to devise a low-pressure manufacturing method that would be less expensive and use less critical wartime materials than the high-pressure method. Hood began manufacturing M1 helmet liners using 4-ounce, resin-impregnated cotton sheeting. This method involved using cotton ribbons, 2 inches and 3/4 inch wide, wound around a heated, ovoid mandrel. Cotton duck was attached around the area of the rim, and a 3 1/2 inch circular piece of resin-impregnated cotton duck was added to the crown. The resulting form of helmet liner was actually two liners joined together, which were then cut to make two semi-formed liner blanks. These blanks were then molded on a steel mold by use of an inflatable rubber bag. The resin-impregnated cotton duck liner blank was then subjected to heated air, injected into a rubber bag at 250 pounds per square inch of pressure. The liner was cured for six minutes at this temperature, and then was trimmed to produce the finished liner. Holes were punched into the liner for rivets to hold the webbing suspension and for the webbing to hold the nape strap, along with lugs for the leather chin strap. The rivets, lugs and suspension were added, the liner was sprayed with olive-drab paint, and a silver "HR" company mark was placed inside the crown. The process resulted in the production of 206,000 liners. Production of the Hood liners took place from late spring, 1942, to late 1943. Their contract was not renewed, and production ceased by the beginning of 1944. High-pressure liners became the preferred type of M1 liner thereafter, with contracts given to Inland, Westinghouse, MSA, the Seaman Paper Company, International Molded Plastics (IMP), Capac, and Firestone. (See Mark Reynosa's book, "The M-1 Helmet: A History of the U.S. M-1 Helmet in World War II, pages 40-42, and Pieter Oosterman's book, M1 Helmet of the WW2 US GI, pages 42-46 for additional details.). *********** This helmet liner is a Hood Rubber Company model produced sometime between spring of 1942 and late 1943. (In fact, this liner may have been produced between the fall of 1942 and early spring of 1943, as Oosterman (pages 108-109) indicates that Hood was given a last additional contract of 6,000 liners in February, 1943, and suggests that these may thereafter have had green-painted washers rather than unpainted steel.) It has the typical impregnated cloth pattern of the Hood liners, and has the circular piece of cloth in the inside crown painted in silver with "HR" for Hood Rubber. The liner has unpainted steel washers, a brass front eyelet, steel nape strap snaps, and blackened brass chinstrap lugs. Webbing is khaki cotton, in single herringbone twill (HBT) weave. Webbing for nape strap at back of liner is khaki cotton, single HBT. The liner has its original phenolic resin-impregnated light OD paint, with what appears to be a light overpaint of a darker OD paint. On front of the liner, roughly centered over the eyelet, is a white-painted insignia for a Technician, Fifth Grade (T-5). This insignia appears to have been stamped, rather than hand-painted, it is slightly smudged but complete. Inside the helmet is a nape strap, this is khaki single HBT with brass snaps, it is stamped with "C.S.C., W11-009-Q.M. 16876, MEDIUM." (This mark indicates that the nape strap was made by the Comfort Slipper Corporation, under a contract issued on October 28, 1943 -- see Oosterman, p. 131.) ******* The liner is completely sound, with no cracks, no dings, some very slight wear but overall excellent. Webbing is slightly soiled, has a nice original khaki color, with no tears or damage other than some small marks from the spring clips of a leather sweatband. The rivets, eyelets, chinstrap lugs, snaps, etc. on the liner are all present and in fine shape. The unpainted steel A-washers that hold the suspension have some light white oxidation and some light rust on a few of the washers, but they are overall very good to excellent. The H.R. mark in the crown is distinct. The T-5 insignia as noted is a little smudged but still excellent. There is some slight paint loss, as the smooth outer finish of the Hood liners did not hold paint well. Overall this is an excellent condition Hood Rubber Company liner. *********** This is a completely original, U.S. M1 helmet liner, manufactured and issued sometime between late spring of 1942 and late fall of 1943. This helmet liner would be appropriate for just about any period of US WWII involvement from 1942 on, including North Africa, Sicily, D-Day invasion of France, ETO fighting summer of 1944 through May of 1945, Battle of the Bulge, and appropriate for the Pacific campaigns of 1942-1945. Used by both U.S. Army troops and U.S. Marines (USMC). ********* Guaranteed 100% original, all components are original to the liner, it has been untouched since WWII, has no alterations, the painted rank insignia is original to the liner. A fine condition, rare example. ********* I can ship worldwide. Buyer pays actual shipping cost only. I am happy to combine multiple items into a single parcel to save on shipping costs. Condition: Used, Condition: The liner is completely sound, with no cracks, no dings, some very slight wear but overall excellent. Webbing is slightly soiled has a nice original khaki color, with no tears or damage other than some small marks from the spring clips of a leather sweatband. The rivets, eyelets, chinstrap lugs, snaps, etc. on the liner are all present and in fine shape. The unpainted steel A-washers that hold the suspension have some light white oxidation and some light rust on a few of the washers, but they are overall very good to excellent. The H.R. mark in the crown is distinct. The T-5 insignia as noted is a little smudged but still excellent. There is some slight paint loss, as the smooth outer finish of the Hood liners did not hold paint well. Overall this is an excellent condition Hood Rubber Company liner.

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