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Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian 4Bronze Statues God Anubis Horus Osiris1870-1780BC

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller egyptanubis (58) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 153000105397 You Are Bidding Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Statue 4 Bronze Statues from right 1st God Horus shown As Falcon 2nd God Osiris shown As pharaoh 3 rd God Anubis Shown jackal head 4th is Ushabti which were used as servant and minions for for Dead. since it shows a scene of the Book of Dead which will happen At judgement Day After Life since at 1st at left it shows Ushabti which will work As servant for Dead at grave after life also 2nd from left you can see God Anubis which is god of dead undeeground who will take the dead to god osiris who will judge fairly and will see if dead will go heaven or hell also 3rd from left god osiris who will manage the dead and will and will see to go to heaven or hell at end god Horus which is falcon head and body of human which is god of sky who after judgement day will take the soulbof the dead eighther to heaven or hell. since if the perso was good god horus will take him to heaven and opposite. since these is scene from book of dead since it shows ushabti wich will work as servant for dead will cook and farm for dead while after god anubus which will be shown as jackal which will take dead to be judged by osiris while after 3rd you can see god osiris which was god who will judge the dead and will give decision if to go to heaven or hell while after god horus who will take the dead and fly with him to heaven such statues were worshipped by ancient egyptians also was taken to grave after deathHeight: 8 cmwidth: 3 cm ###××Ancient Egyptian God Horus God Horus is one of the most significant ancient egyptian deities He was considered to be a celestial falcon, and so his name could be a specific reference to the flight of the falcon, but could also be seen as a more general solar reference. It is thought that the worship of Horus was brought into Egypt during the predynastic period. He was the protector and patron of the pharaoh. As Horus was associated with upper egypt and lower egypt he was the perfect choice for a unified country and it seems that he was considered to be the royal god even before unification took place. The Pharaoh was often considered to be the embodiment of Horus while alive . The most commonly encountered family relationship describes Horus as the son of Isis and Osiris, and he plays a key role in the Osiris myth as Osiris's heir and the rival to Set, the murderer of Osiris. In another tradition Hathor is regarded as his mother and sometimes as his wife.Horus served many functions, most notably being a god of the sky, war and hunting. The Pyramid Texts (c. 2400–2300 BC) describe the nature of the pharaoh in different characters as both Horus and Osiris. The pharaoh as Horus in life became the pharaoh as Osiris in death, where he was united with the rest of the gods. New incarnations of Horus succeeded the deceased pharaoh on earth in the form of new pharaohs The lineage of Horus, the eventual product of unions between the children of Atum, may have been a means to explain and justify pharaonic power. The gods produced by Atum were all representative of cosmic and terrestrial forces in Egyptian life. By identifying Horus as the offspring of these forces, then identifying him with Atum himself, and finally identifying the Pharaoh with Horus, the Pharaoh theologically had dominion over all the world. The notion of Horus as the pharaoh seems to have been superseded by the concept of the pharaoh as the son of Ra during the Fifth Dynasty. Horus was born to the goddess Isis after she retrieved all the dismembered body parts of her murdered husband Osiris, except hispenis, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by a catfish,] or sometimes depicted as instead by a crab, and according toPlutarch's account used her magic powers to resurrect Osiris and fashion a goldenphallus to conceive her son (older Egyptian accounts have the penis of Osiris surviving). Once Isis knew she was pregnant with Horus, she fled to the Nile Delta marshlands to hide from her brother Set, who jealously killed Osiris and who she knew would want to kill their son. There Isis bore a divine son, Horus. However, seth chose to place Horus´ opposite and enemy set . As a result, that the mythical battle between Horus and set was once a real battle between the followers of Set and the followers of Horus. If this was the case, it would seem that the followers of Horus won as Horus remained a popular emblem of kingship while set was gradually transformed into a symbol of evil. The Pharaoh also had a name (known as the "Golden Horus" name) which was preceded by an image of a sacred hawk on the symbol for gold which specifically linked the Pharaoh to the god. set was the embodiment of disorder and chaos while Horus was the embodiment of order. The Egyptian God Horus was usually depicted as a falcon, . Horus was also said to be a god of war and hunting. The Horus falcon is shown upon a standard on the prehistoric Hunters Palette in the "lion hunt". Thus he became a symbol of majesty and power as well as the model of the pharaohs, who were said to be Horus in human form. Since Horus was said to be god of the sky, he was considered to also contain the sun and moon.It became said]that the sun was his right eye and the moon his left, and that they traversed the sky when he, a falcon, flew across it. Later, the reason that the moon was not as bright as the sun was explained by a tale, known as the The Contendings of Horus and Seth. In this tale, it was said that Set, the patron of Upper Egypt, and Horus, the patron of Lower Egypt, had battled for Egypt brutally, with neither side victorious, until eventually the gods sided with Horus. As Horus was the ultimate victor he became known as ḥr.w wr "Horus the Great", but more usually translated "Horus the Elder". In the struggle, Set had lost a testicle, explaining why the desert, which Set represented, is infertile. Horus' left eye had also been gouged out, then a new eye was created by part ofKhonsu, the moon god, and was replaced. Horus represented the eclipsing binary Algolin the Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days The Eye of Horus is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection and royal power from deities, in this case from Horus or Ra. The symbol is seen on images of Horus' mother, Isis, and on other deities associated with her. In the Egyptian language, the word for this symbol was "wedjat" (wɟt).It was the eye of one of the earliest of Egyptian deities,Wadjet, who later became associated withBastet, Mut, and Hathor as well. Wadjet was asolar deity and this symbol began as her all-seeing eye. In early artwork, Hathor is also depicted with this eye.Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The Wedjat "was intended to protect the king in the afterlife"and to ward off evil. Egyptian and Near Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bow of their vessel to ensure safe sea travel. Horus was told by his mother, Isis, to protect the people of Egypt from Set, the god of the desert, who had killed Horus' father, Osiris Horus had many battles with Set, not only to avenge his father, but to choose the rightful ruler of Egypt. In these battles, Horus came to be associated with Lower Egypt, and became its patron. According to The Contendings of Horus and Seth, Set is depicted as trying to prove his dominance by seducing Horus and then having sexual intercourse with him. However, Horus places his hand between his thighs and catches Set's semen, then subsequently throws it in the river so that he may not be said to have been inseminated by Set. Horus then deliberately spreads his own semen on some lettuce, which was Set's favorite food. After Set had eaten the lettuce, they went to the gods to try to settle the argument over the rule of Egypt. The gods first listened to Set's claim of dominance over Horus, and call his semen forth, but it answered from the river, invalidating his claim. Then, the gods listened to Horus' claim of having dominated Set, and call his semen forth, and it answered from inside Set many versions of the story, Horus and Set divide the realm between them. This division can be equated with any of several fundamental dualities that the Egyptians saw in their world. Horus may receive the fertile lands around the Nile, the core of Egyptian civilization, in which case Set takes the barren desert or the foreign lands that are associated with it; Horus may rule the earth while Set dwells in the sky; and each god may take one of the two traditional halves of the country, Upper and Lower Egypt, in which case either god may be connected with either region. Yet in the Memphite Theology, Geb, as judge, first apportions the realm between the claimants and then reverses himself, awarding sole control to Horus. In this peaceable union, Horus and Set are reconciled, and the dualities that they represent have been resolved into a united whole. Through this resolution, order is restored after the tumultuous conflict God Osiris Osiris was an Ancient Egyptian god, usually identified as the god of the afterlife, the underworld, and the dead, but more appropriately as the god of transition, resurrection, and regeneration. He was classically depicted as a skinned man with a pharaoh's beard, partially mummy-wrapped at his back, wearing a distinctive crown , and holding a symbolic crook and flail. Osiris was at times considered the oldest son of the earth god Geb, though other sources state his father is the sun-god Ra, and the sky goddess Nut, as well as being brother and husband of Isis, with Horus being considered his posthumously begotten son. He was also associated with the epithet Khenti-Amentiu, meaning "Foremost of the Westerners", a reference to his kingship in the land of the dead. As ruler of the dead, Osiris was also sometimes called "king of the living": ancient Egyptians considered the blessed dead "the living ones". Osiris was considered not only a merciful judge of the dead in the afterlife, but also theunderworld agency that granted all life, including sprouting vegetation and the fertile flooding of the Nile River. He was described as the "Lord of love",He Who is Permanently Benign and Youthful" and the"Lord of Silence".The Kings of Egypt were associated with Osiris in death – as Osiris rose from the dead they would, in union with him, inherit eternal life through a process of imitative magic. By the New Kingdom all people, not just pharaohs, were believed to be associated with Osiris at death, if they incurred the costs of the assimilation rituals. Through the hope of new life after death, Osiris began to be associated with the cycles observed in nature, in particular vegetation and the annual flooding of the Nile, through his links with the heliacal rising of Orion andSirius at the start of the new year. Osiris was widely worshipped as Lord of the Dead until the suppression of the Egyptian religionduring the rise of Christianity in the Roman Ancient Egyptians believed that death was in fact transition. They believed that the ka, or life-force, left the body at the point of death and even their practices of preserving the body further indicated their understanding of the continuance of life. Hence, Osiris is known as the God of Transition and also commonly well known as the God of Resurrection and Regeneration #××Ancient Egyptian God AnubisGod of cemeteries and embalming Anubis god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head ( dog or jackal head).Archeologists identified the sacred animal of Anubis as an Egyptian canid, that at the time was called the golden jackal.Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer he was replaced by Osiris in his role as lord of theunderworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart," in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and "one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods" in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths.symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming a "jackal" was chosen to protect the dead. The oldest known textual mention of Anubis is in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh.the Old Kingdom, Anubis was the most important god of the dead. He was replaced in that role by Osiris during the Middle Kingdom., tomb paintings depict him holding the hand of deceased persons to guide them to Osiris. contrast to real wolves, Anubis was a protector of graves and cemeteries. Several epithets attached to his name in Egyptian texts and inscriptions referred to that role.Khenty-imentiu, which means "foremost of the westerners" and later became the name of adifferent wolf god, alluded to his protecting function because the dead were usually buried on the west bank of the Nile.He took other names in connection with his funerary role, such as "He who is upon his mountain" (tepy-dju-ef) – keeping guard over tombs from above – and "Lord of the sacred land" (neb-ta-djeser), which designates him as a god of the desert necropolis. As "He who is in the place of embalming" (imy-ut), Anubis was associated withmummification. He was also called "He who presides over the god's pavilion" (khanty-she-netjer), in which "pavilion" could be refer either to the place where embalming was carried out, or the pharaoh's burial chamber. One of the roles of Anubis was as the "Guardian of the Scales.The critical scene depicting the weighing of the heart, in theBook of the Dead, shows Anubis performing a measurement that determined whether the person was worthy of entering the realm of the dead (the underworld, known as Duat). By weighing the heart of a deceased person against Ma'at (or "truth"), who was often represented as an ostrich feather, Anubis dictated the fate of souls. Souls heavier than a feather would be devoured by Ammit, and souls lighter than a feather would ascend to a heavenly existence Ancient Egyptian Ushabti ushabti (also called shabti or shawabti, with a number of variant spellings, Ancient Egyptian plural: ushabtiu) was a funeraryfigurine used in Ancient Egypt. Ushabtis were placed in tombs among the grave goods and were intended to act as servants or minions for the deceased, should they be called upon to do manual labor in the afterlife. Ushabti were intended to farm for the deceased. They were usually written on by the use of hieroglyphs typically found on the legs.Called “answerers,” they carried inscriptions asserting their readiness to answer the gods' summons to work. The practice of using ushabtis originated in the Old Kingdom (c. 2600 to 2100 BCE) with the use of life-sized reserve heads made from limestone, which were buried with the mummy.Most ushabtis were of minor size, and many produced in multiples – they sometimes covered the floor around a sarcophagus. During ancient period there is some evidence of the sacrificial burial of servants with the deceased. However, this practice was quickly seen as unnecessary and wasteful, and instead symbolic images of servants were painted inside tombs to aid the deceased in the afterworld. This practice developed into the use of small statuettes known as Shabti (Shabtiu, Shabty, Shawabti or Ushabti). A UShabti is a small figure representing a person who would perform a given task for the deceased in the afterlife. The Amduat (underworld) included tracts of land granted to the deceased by the sun god Ra from which the blessed dead could receive their nourishment. Unsurprisingly, wealthy nobles and royalty did not plan on doing any work themselves and so they would take their (symbolic) servants with them. Early versions (Shabti or Shabtiu) were modelled to represent the task that they would perform and given tiny tools etc with which to complete their tasks. Later on Shawabti (and Ushabti) were inscribed with a magical formula which would activate them. as they put at tombs to work the dead persone and to do for hime his Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture Condition: As shown At picture, Provenance: Luxor, Material: Bronze

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