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Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Papyrus God Hathor Pyramid Celebration2589–2566BC

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Seller: egyptanubis (55) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 152973826174 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Papyrus which is very Rare to find A Papyrus in these condition since it is very Rare since these papyrus were during king khufu life during the build of the pyramids and these papyrus were made for celebration of build of pyramids. since pyramid were build for funeral of the king khufu. since it shows here 8 cows which is God ( Hathor ) which is God of Joy Dance music. since god Hathor were used during celebration in order to bring joy dance love for the people. while you can see a priest infront of God Hathor while he is reading Magical words which will make goddess Hathor brings joy dance good music and will make good celebration. on the other way these cows ( goddess Hathor) has to increase love dance joy during life also the 2nd role is to nake love joy dance celebration after death since it will fly after king pharaoh khufu death and will bring koy love dance during his funeral trip till he reaches the heaven. since at the back of goddess. since at the back of goddess hathor you can see oars of funeral boat which the king will use during his funeral trip to sky till he reaches to heaven. since it shows the oars of funeral boat which goddess hathor will use during the funeral trip with the king. since Goddess hathor here has 2 roles 1st in life since it will bring love joy dance during the celebration of the finish of the build of the build of pyramide. also the 2nd rold of goddess Hathor is to celebrate king khufu after his death to his trip at sky to the heaven to brings love dance to servants and people who has dies who will make the fly with king khufu since you can see oars of the funeral boat which they will use after king death to bring love joy dance since there is priest who is reading funeral words on Goddess Hathor to brings more love dance joy . the papyrus is full of words with hiroglyphic and about build of great pyramid and the celebration of finish if pyramids also lot of words about funeral trip to the sky and they put oars which will use goddess hathor during trip since. these is very very rare papyrus which is very difficult to find like it again . since these papyrus was made during build of pyramids since it is rarest Height: 42 cmwidth:30 cm Goddess Hathor Goddess of the sky, dance, love, beauty, joy, motherhood, foreign lands, mining, music and fertility. Hathor is an Ancient Egyptian goddess who personified the principles of joy, feminine love, and motherhood.She was one of the most important and popular deities throughout the history of Ancient Egypt. Hathor was worshipped by royalty and common people alike. In tomb paintings, she is often depicted as "Mistress of the West," welcoming the dead into the next life. In other roles, she was a goddess of music, dance, foreign lands, andfertility. She was believed to assist women in childbirth. She was also believed to be the patron goddess of miners.The cult of Hathor predates the historic period, and the roots of devotion to her are therefore difficult to trace, though it may be a development of predynastic cults which venerated fertility, and nature in general, represented by cows.Hathor is commonly depicted as a cow goddess with horns in which is set a sun disk with Uraeus. Twin feathers are also sometimes shown in later periods as well as amenat necklace. Hathor may be the cow goddess who is depicted from an early date on the Narmer Palette and on a stone urn dating from the 1st dynasty that suggests a role as sky-goddess and a relationship to Horus who, as a sun god, is "housed" in her.The Ancient Egyptians viewed reality as multi-layered in which deities who merge for various reasons, while retaining divergent attributes and myths, were not seen as contradictory but complementary.In a complicated relationship Hathor is at times the mother, daughter and wife of Ra and, likeIsis, is at times described as the mother of Horus, and associated with Bast.The cult of Osiris promised eternal life to those deemed morally worthy. Originally the justified dead, male or female, became an Osiris but by early Roman times females became identified with Hathor and men with osiris. Hathor is ambiguously depicted until the fourth dynasty.As In the historical era Hathor is shown using the imagery of a cow deity. Artifacts from pre-dynastic times depict cow deities using the same symbolism as used later time for hathorA cow deity appears on the belt of the King on the Narmer Palette dated to the pre-dynastic era, and this is Hathor or, in another guise, . The evidence pointing to the deity being Hathor in particular is based on a passage from thePyramid texts which states that the King's apron comes from Hathor.A stone urn recovered from Hierakonpolis and dated to the first dynasty has on its rim the face of a cow deity with stars on its ears and horns that may relate to Hathor's role as a sky-goddess. Another artifact from the first dynasty shows a cow lying down on an ivory engraving with the inscription "Hathor in the Marshes" indicating her association with vegetation and the papyrus marsh in particular. From the Old Kingdom she was also called Lady of the Sycamore in her capacity as a tree deity. Hathor had a complex relationship with Ra. At times she is the eye of Ra and considered his daughter, but she is also considered Ra's mother. She absorbed this role from another cow goddess Mehet-Weret ("Great flood") who was the mother of Ra in a creation myth and carried him between her horns. As a mother she gave birth to Ra each morning on the eastern horizon and as wife she conceives through union with him each day.Hathor, along with the goddess Nut, was associated with the Milky Way during the third millennium B.C. when, during the fall and spring equinoxes, it aligned over and touched the earth where the sun rose and fell.] The four legs of the celestial cow represented Nut or Hathor could, in one account, be seen as the pillars on which the sky was supported with the stars on their bellies constituting the Milky Way on which the solar barque of Ra, representing the sun, sailed The Milky Way was seen as a waterway in the heavens, sailed upon by both the sun deity and the moon, leading the ancient Egyptiansto describe it as The Nile in the Sky.Hathor also was favoured as a protector in desert regions AsSerabit el-Khadim was where turquoise was mined, Hathor's titles included "Lady of Turquoise", "Mistress of Turquoise", and "Lady of Turquoise Country".[Hathor's identity as a cow perhaps depicted as such on the Narmer Palette, meant that she became identified with another ancient cow-goddess of fertility, Bat.The assimilation of Bat, who was associated with the sistrum, a musical instrument, brought with it an association with music. In this later form, Hathor's cult became centred in Dendera in Upper Egypt and it was led by priestesses and priests who also were dancers, singers and other dieties The Book of the Heavenly Cow states that while Ra was ruling the earth, humans began plotting against him. Ra sent Hathor, in the form of the warlike goddess Sekhmet, to destroy them. Hathor (as Sekhmet) became bloodthirsty and the slaughter was great because she could not be stopped. As the slaughter continued, Ra saw the chaos down below and decided to stop the blood-thirsty goddess. So he poured huge quantities of blood-coloured beer on the ground to trick Sekhmet. She drank so much of it—thinking it to be blood—that she became drunk and returned to her former gentle self as Hathor Book of dead Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of theNew Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of textsconsisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw,] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlierPyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period (11th to 7th centuries BCE). A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased.There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. TheBook of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrusscroll, and often illustrated with vignettesdepicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead is made up of a number of individual texts and their accompanying illustrations. Most sub-texts begin with the word ro, which can mean mouth, speech, a chapter of a book, spell, utterance, or incantation. This ambiguity reflects the similarity in Egyptian thought between ritual speech and magical power. In the context of the Book of the Dead, it is typically translated as either "chapter" or "spell". In this article, the word "spell" is used.At present, some 192 spells are known,[]though no single manuscript contains them all. They served a range of purposes. Some are intended to give the deceased mystical knowledge in the afterlife, or perhaps to identify them with the gods: for instance, Spell 17, is an obscure and lengthy description of the god Atum.Others are incantations to ensure the different elements of the dead person's being were preserved and reunited, and to give the deceased control over the world around him. Still others protect the deceased from various hostile forces, or guide him through the underworld past various obstacles. Famously, two spells also deal with the judgement of the deceased in theWeighing of the Heart ritual.Such spells as 26-30, and sometimes spells 6 and 126 relate to the heart, and were inscribed on scarabs.The texts and images of the Book of the Deadwere magical as well as religious. Magic was as legitimate an activity as praying to the gods, even when the magic was aimed at controlling the gods themselves.[] Indeed, there was little distinction for the Ancient Egyptians between magical and religious practice.The concept of magic (heka) was also intimately linked with the spoken and written word. The act of speaking a ritual formula was an act of creation;there is a sense in which action and speech were one and the same thing.] The magical power of words extended to the written word. Hieroglyphic script was held to have been invented by the god Thoth, and the hieroglyphs themselves were powerful. Written words conveyed the full force of a spell.This was even true when the text was abbreviated or omitted, as often occurred in later Book of the Dead scrolls, particularly if the accompanying images were present.The Egyptians also believed that knowing the name of something gave power over it; thus, the Book of the Dead equips its owner with the mystical names of many of the entities he would encounter in the afterlife, giving him power over them.The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life. A number of spells are for magical amulets, which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.Everyday magic made use of amulets in huge numbers. Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value.A number of spells also refer to Egyptian beliefs about the magical healing power of such book. He has to confront a formidable array of gods: Bone-Crusher, Shining-Tooth, Blood-Consumer, Flint-Eyes, Entrail-Consumer ]and many others with less frightening names assembled here from many places all over Egypt. He declares himself innocent of wrong-doing towards the gods and his fellow men. These protestations of guiltlessness of trespasses against society and cultic rules remained remarkably unchanged during the course of history. They, and similar passages in the Instructions literature, are accepted as being the standard of ancient Egyptian ethical behaviour. The writing down of these declarations and the knowledge of the gods' names was powerful magic, forcing the gods to accept his protestations of innocence, above all when they were repeated:I am pure.I am pure.I am pure.I am pure. The scales are topped by Maat, goddess of Justice, Truth and Order, wearing a feather on her head. Ammut, Devourer of the Dead, whose... forepart is like that of a crocodile, the middle of her body is like that of a lion, her hind quarters are like those of a hippopotamusThe Papyrus of Ani from the description of the beast Am-mitis ready to destroy the deceased if his heart should be full of sin and consequently too heavy. The deceased, well aware that he has not led a life as completely blameless as one might have hoped, implores his heart not to give him away, reminds it that their fate is intertwined, promises bliss in the hereafter, and even appeals to its altruism: a judge is happiest when his decision is favourable to the deceased.O my heart of my being!Do not rise up against me as witness,Do not oppose me in the tribunal,Do not rebel against me before the guardian of the scales!You are my ka within my body,The Khnum who prospers my limbs.Go to the good place prepared for us,Do not make my name stink before them,The magistrates who put people in their places!If it's good for us it's good for the judge,It pleases him who renders judgment.Do not invent lies before the god,Before the great god, the lord of the west,Lo, your uprightness brings vindication!The Papyrus of Ani A jar containing the heart is placed on one of the pans, while the other is weighed down by the feather of Maat. Anubis does the weighing, giving the scales a nudge in the right direction with the ankh. Thoth, god of wisdom who had given mankind the hieroglyphs, writes down the decision. Just as the Egyptians in this world liked to document everything, so did their gods in the next."Come," says Thoth, "why have you come?""I have come and I press forward so that I may be announced.""What now is your condition?""I am purified from evil things, I am protected from the evil deeds of those who live in their days: I am not among them.""Now I will announce you. But who is he whose heaven is fire, whose walls are cobras, and whose floor is a stream of water? Who is he, I say?""He is Osiris.""Come forward, then, you will be announced to him. Your cakes will come from the Eye of Ra, your beer from the Eye, your meals of the dead from the Eye. This has been decreed for the Osiris the overseer of the house of the overseer of the seal, Nu, triumphant." Horus leads the way, holding an ankh. The deceased follows him freely to meet Osiris, with whom he will be identified as one of his followers.His heart is righteous, and it hath come forth from the Balance; it hath not sinned against any god or any goddess. Thoth hath weighed it according to the decree pronounced unto him by the Company of the Gods, and it is most true and righteous. Grant thou that cakes and ale may be given unto him, and let him appear in the presence of the god Osiris, and let him be like into the Followers of Horus for ever and ever. He is received by the god of the Duat, the Realm of the Dead, and his two sisters, Isis and Nephthys. The four sons of Horus stand on a lotus flower growing out of the waters over which stands the throne of Osiris Behold, I am in thy presence, O Lord of Amentet (the West). There is no sin in my body. I have not spoken that which is not true knowingly, nor have I done anything with a false heart. Grant thou that I may be like unto those favoured ones who are in thy following, and that I may be an Osiris greatly favoured of the beautiful god, and beloved of the Lord of the Two Lands, I who am a veritable royal scribe who loveth thee, Ani, whose word is true before the god Osiris. And now begins the dangerous journey of the new Osiris through the Underworld. Thanks to the Opening of the Mouth ceremony he is capable to utter the spells necessary to complete his journeyBehold, I will gather together to myself this charm from the person with whom it is [and from the place] wherein it is [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. Hail, thou who bringest the Ferry-Boat of Ra, thou holdest thy course firmly and directly in the north wind as thou sailest up the river towards the Island of Fire which is in Khert-Neter (the necropolis, i.e. the realm of the dead). Behold, thou shalt gather together to thee this charm from wheresoever it may be, and from whomsoever it may be with [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. It (the charm) made the transformations of Mut; it fashioned the gods [or] kept them silent; by it Mut gave the warmth [of life] to the gods. Behold, these words of power are mine, and they shall come unto me from wheresoever they may be, or with whomsoever they may be, quicker than greyhounds and swifter than light. Heavenly Cow The Book of the Heavenly Cow, or the Book of the Cow of Heaven, is an Ancient Egyptian text thought to have originated during pharaoh Khufu period and, in part, describes the reasons for the imperfect state of the world in terms of humankind's rebellion against the supreme sun god, Ra. Divine punishment was inflicted through the goddess Hathor, with the survivors suffering through separation from Ra, who now resided in the sky on the back of Nut, the heavenly cow.With this "fall", suffering and death came into the world, along with a fracture in the original unity of creation. The supreme god now changes into many heavenly bodies, creates the "Fields of Paradise" for the blessed dead, perhaps appoints Geb as his heir, hands over the rule of humankind to Osiris (Thoth ruling the night sky as his deputy), with Shu and the Heh gods now supporting the sky goddess Nut.Though the text is recorded in the New Kingdom period, it is written in Middle Egyptian and may have been written during the Middle Kingdom period. The Book of the Heavenly Cow appears on the walls of the tombs of Seti I, Ramesses II, Ramesses III, Ramesses VI. And Tutankhamun.The Book of the Heavenly Cow was first discovered in the outermost gilded shrine of Tutankhamun; however, the ancient text was incomplete. Fortunately, three complete versions of the ancient text were discovered, in the tombs of Seti I, Ramesses II, and Ramesses III. Each version of the texts was found in a subsidiary room of the sarcophagus chamber exclusively designed for the Book of the Heavenly Cow.Ramesses VI did not have a subsidiary room. He had a shorter description of the Book of the Heavenly Cow, written on a papyrus from the Ramesside period. The book may have originated from the Pyramid Texts dawn myth accounts, but by the New Kingdom the idea was developed to explain death and suffering in an imperfect creation. The work has been viewed as a form of theodicy and a magical text to ensure the king's ascent into heaven. It has also been viewed as thematically similar to more developed accounts of the destruction of humanity in the Mesopotamian and biblical stories of the flood. The reign of Akhenaten – the pharaoh who had attempted to bring about a break in the existent religious traditions – may be the inspiration for the work The Book of the Heavenly Cow is divided in half by the image of the cow and her supporters. There are no visible breaks in the actual text of The Heavenly Cow, aside from the representation of the Heavenly Cow. Due to this there are no clear breaks in the text that allow for a clear structuring of the text. However, Egyptologists who have examined the text closely have suggested a loose division of the text into four sections. The first section describes the "Destruction of Mankind", in which humanity plot against the Sun God Ra. After Ra consulting with the other gods, the goddess Hathor is chosen by Ra, to act as the violent Eye of Ra. She was to deliver divine punishment to humanity and did so by slaughtering the rebels and bringing death into the world. The survivors of Hathor’s wrath were saved when Ra tricks Hathor by putting dyed beer that resembled blood, which Hathor drinks, becoming intoxicated. The final part of the text deal with Ra's ascension into the sky, the creation of the underworld, and with the theology surrounding the ba (soul).7 The structure of the ancient Egyptian text the Book of the Heavenly Cow is structed into 330 verses. With half of the text occur before a description or representation of the Heavenly Cow. The language used in the Book of the Heavenly Cow displays roots from Late Egyptian influences. Due to the ancient text containing roots from Late Egypt, is widely believed among Egyptology scholars that the Book of the Heavenly Cow originated during the Amarna period. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture Condition: As shown At picture, Material: Papyrus, Provenance: Giza

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