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Rare-Antique-Ancient-Egyptian-Statue-God-Anubis-mummification-death-1760-1620BC

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Seller: egyptanubis (48) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 152978728344 You Are bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Statue God Anubis shown with jackal head and body of human. Since God Anubis was important God For Ancient Egyptians since he was God of mummification and After life cemeteries & embalming also he was protector of Graves. since these statue was made from hammer stone by Ancient Egyptians to worship it also they took it with them to graves to protect grave and mummy from anything. since god Anubis used to mummify their bodies after death. since they thought at judgement day god Anubis will take dead from his hand to judge the dead infront of God Osiris . also they kept at graveHeight: 19cmWidth:6 cm #××Ancient Egyptian God AnubisGod of cemeteries and embalming Anubis god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head ( dog or jackal head).Archeologists identified the sacred animal of Anubis as an Egyptian canid, that at the time was called the golden jackal.Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer he was replaced by Osiris in his role as lord of theunderworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart," in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and "one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods" in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths.symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming a "jackal" was chosen to protect the dead. The oldest known textual mention of Anubis is in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh.the Old Kingdom, Anubis was the most important god of the dead. He was replaced in that role by Osiris during the Middle Kingdom., tomb paintings depict him holding the hand of deceased persons to guide them to Osiris. contrast to real wolves, Anubis was a protector of graves and cemeteries. Several epithets attached to his name in Egyptian texts and inscriptions referred to that role.Khenty-imentiu, which means "foremost of the westerners" and later became the name of adifferent wolf god, alluded to his protecting function because the dead were usually buried on the west bank of the Nile.He took other names in connection with his funerary role, such as "He who is upon his mountain" (tepy-dju-ef) – keeping guard over tombs from above – and "Lord of the sacred land" (neb-ta-djeser), which designates him as a god of the desert necropolis. As "He who is in the place of embalming" (imy-ut), Anubis was associated withmummification. He was also called "He who presides over the god's pavilion" (khanty-she-netjer), in which "pavilion" could be refer either to the place where embalming was carried out, or the pharaoh's burial chamber. One of the roles of Anubis was as the "Guardian of the Scales.The critical scene depicting the weighing of the heart, in theBook of the Dead, shows Anubis performing a measurement that determined whether the person was worthy of entering the realm of the dead (the underworld, known as Duat). By weighing the heart of a deceased person against Ma'at (or "truth"), who was often represented as an ostrich feather, Anubis dictated the fate of souls. Souls heavier than a feather would be devoured by Ammit, and souls lighter than a feather would ascend to a heavenly existence Book of dead Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of theNew Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of textsconsisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw,] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlierPyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period (11th to 7th centuries BCE). A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased.There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. TheBook of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrusscroll, and often illustrated with vignettesdepicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead is made up of a number of individual texts and their accompanying illustrations. Most sub-texts begin with the word ro, which can mean mouth, speech, a chapter of a book, spell, utterance, or incantation. This ambiguity reflects the similarity in Egyptian thought between ritual speech and magical power. In the context of the Book of the Dead, it is typically translated as either "chapter" or "spell". In this article, the word "spell" is used.At present, some 192 spells are known,[]though no single manuscript contains them all. They served a range of purposes. Some are intended to give the deceased mystical knowledge in the afterlife, or perhaps to identify them with the gods: for instance, Spell 17, is an obscure and lengthy description of the god Atum.Others are incantations to ensure the different elements of the dead person's being were preserved and reunited, and to give the deceased control over the world around him. Still others protect the deceased from various hostile forces, or guide him through the underworld past various obstacles. Famously, two spells also deal with the judgement of the deceased in theWeighing of the Heart ritual.Such spells as 26-30, and sometimes spells 6 and 126 relate to the heart, and were inscribed on scarabs.The texts and images of the Book of the Deadwere magical as well as religious. Magic was as legitimate an activity as praying to the gods, even when the magic was aimed at controlling the gods themselves.[] Indeed, there was little distinction for the Ancient Egyptians between magical and religious practice.The concept of magic (heka) was also intimately linked with the spoken and written word. The act of speaking a ritual formula was an act of creation;there is a sense in which action and speech were one and the same thing.] The magical power of words extended to the written word. Hieroglyphic script was held to have been invented by the god Thoth, and the hieroglyphs themselves were powerful. Written words conveyed the full force of a spell.This was even true when the text was abbreviated or omitted, as often occurred in later Book of the Dead scrolls, particularly if the accompanying images were present.The Egyptians also believed that knowing the name of something gave power over it; thus, the Book of the Dead equips its owner with the mystical names of many of the entities he would encounter in the afterlife, giving him power over them.The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life. A number of spells are for magical amulets, which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.Everyday magic made use of amulets in huge numbers. Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value.A number of spells also refer to Egyptian beliefs about the magical healing power of such book. He has to confront a formidable array of gods: Bone-Crusher, Shining-Tooth, Blood-Consumer, Flint-Eyes, Entrail-Consumer ]and many others with less frightening names assembled here from many places all over Egypt. He declares himself innocent of wrong-doing towards the gods and his fellow men. These protestations of guiltlessness of trespasses against society and cultic rules remained remarkably unchanged during the course of history. They, and similar passages in the Instructions literature, are accepted as being the standard of ancient Egyptian ethical behaviour. The writing down of these declarations and the knowledge of the gods' names was powerful magic, forcing the gods to accept his protestations of innocence, above all when they were repeated:I am pure.I am pure.I am pure.I am pure. The scales are topped by Maat, goddess of Justice, Truth and Order, wearing a feather on her head. Ammut, Devourer of the Dead, whose... forepart is like that of a crocodile, the middle of her body is like that of a lion, her hind quarters are like those of a hippopotamusThe Papyrus of Ani from the description of the beast Am-mitis ready to destroy the deceased if his heart should be full of sin and consequently too heavy. The deceased, well aware that he has not led a life as completely blameless as one might have hoped, implores his heart not to give him away, reminds it that their fate is intertwined, promises bliss in the hereafter, and even appeals to its altruism: a judge is happiest when his decision is favourable to the deceased.O my heart of my being!Do not rise up against me as witness,Do not oppose me in the tribunal,Do not rebel against me before the guardian of the scales!You are my ka within my body,The Khnum who prospers my limbs.Go to the good place prepared for us,Do not make my name stink before them,The magistrates who put people in their places!If it's good for us it's good for the judge,It pleases him who renders judgment.Do not invent lies before the god,Before the great god, the lord of the west,Lo, your uprightness brings vindication!The Papyrus of Ani A jar containing the heart is placed on one of the pans, while the other is weighed down by the feather of Maat. Anubis does the weighing, giving the scales a nudge in the right direction with the ankh. Thoth, god of wisdom who had given mankind the hieroglyphs, writes down the decision. Just as the Egyptians in this world liked to document everything, so did their gods in the next."Come," says Thoth, "why have you come?""I have come and I press forward so that I may be announced.""What now is your condition?""I am purified from evil things, I am protected from the evil deeds of those who live in their days: I am not among them.""Now I will announce you. But who is he whose heaven is fire, whose walls are cobras, and whose floor is a stream of water? Who is he, I say?""He is Osiris.""Come forward, then, you will be announced to him. Your cakes will come from the Eye of Ra, your beer from the Eye, your meals of the dead from the Eye. This has been decreed for the Osiris the overseer of the house of the overseer of the seal, Nu, triumphant." Horus leads the way, holding an ankh. The deceased follows him freely to meet Osiris, with whom he will be identified as one of his followers.His heart is righteous, and it hath come forth from the Balance; it hath not sinned against any god or any goddess. Thoth hath weighed it according to the decree pronounced unto him by the Company of the Gods, and it is most true and righteous. Grant thou that cakes and ale may be given unto him, and let him appear in the presence of the god Osiris, and let him be like into the Followers of Horus for ever and ever. He is received by the god of the Duat, the Realm of the Dead, and his two sisters, Isis and Nephthys. The four sons of Horus stand on a lotus flower growing out of the waters over which stands the throne of Osiris Behold, I am in thy presence, O Lord of Amentet (the West). There is no sin in my body. I have not spoken that which is not true knowingly, nor have I done anything with a false heart. Grant thou that I may be like unto those favoured ones who are in thy following, and that I may be an Osiris greatly favoured of the beautiful god, and beloved of the Lord of the Two Lands, I who am a veritable royal scribe who loveth thee, Ani, whose word is true before the god Osiris. And now begins the dangerous journey of the new Osiris through the Underworld. Thanks to the Opening of the Mouth ceremony he is capable to utter the spells necessary to complete his journeyBehold, I will gather together to myself this charm from the person with whom it is [and from the place] wherein it is [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. Hail, thou who bringest the Ferry-Boat of Ra, thou holdest thy course firmly and directly in the north wind as thou sailest up the river towards the Island of Fire which is in Khert-Neter (the necropolis, i.e. the realm of the dead). Behold, thou shalt gather together to thee this charm from wheresoever it may be, and from whomsoever it may be with [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. It (the charm) made the transformations of Mut; it fashioned the gods [or] kept them silent; by it Mut gave the warmth [of life] to the gods. Behold, these words of power are mine, and they shall come unto me from wheresoever they may be, or with whomsoever they may be, quicker than greyhounds and swifter than light. Paymet- We accept paypal shipmen- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown At picture, Provenance: Luxor, Material: Hammer Stone

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